Effects of peripheral cold application on core body temperature and haemodynamic parameters in febrile patients

Authors

  • Hossein Asgar Pour RN PhD,

    Lecturer, Doctor, Corresponding author
    1. Department of Surgical Nursing, Aydin Health School, Adnan Menderes University, Aydin, Turkey
    • Correspondence: Hossein Asgar Pour, Adnan Menderes Universitesi, Aydin Saglik Yuksekokulu, Cerrahi Anabilim Dali, Aydin 09000, Turkey. Email: hasgarpour23@yahoo.com

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  • Meryem Yavuz RN PhD

    Professor, Lecturer
    1. Department of Surgical Nursing, School of Nursing, Ege University, Izmir, Turkey
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Abstract

This study designed to assess the effects of peripheral cold application (PCA) on core body temperature and haemodynamic parameters in febrile patients. This study was an experimental, repeated-measures performed in the neurosurgical intensive-care unit. The research sample included all patients with fever in postoperative period. PCA was performed for 20 min. During fever, systolic blood pressure, mean arterial blood pressure and arterial oxygen saturation (O2Sat) decreased by 5.07 ± 7.89 mm Hg, 0.191 ± 6.00 mm Hg and 0.742% ± 0.97%, respectively, whereas the pulse rate and diastolic blood pressure increased by 8.528 ± 4.42 beats/ min and 1.842 ± 6.9 mmHg, respectively. Immediately after PCA, core body temperature and pulse rate decreased by 0.3°C, 3.3 beats/min, respectively, whereas systolic, diastolic, mean arterial blood pressure and O2Sat increased by, 1.40 mm Hg, 1.87 mm Hg, 0.98 mmHg and 0.27%, respectively. Thirty minutes after the end of PCA, core body temperature, diastolic, mean arterial blood pressure and pulse rate decreased by 0.57°C, 0.34 mm Hg, 0.60 mm Hg and 4.5 beats/min, respectively, whereas systolic blood pressure and O2Sat increased by 0.98 mm Hg and 0.04%, respectively. The present results showed that PCA increases systolic, diastolic, mean arterial blood pressure and O2Sat, and decreases core body temperature and pulse rate.

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