Get access

Physical activity levels and torso orientations of hospitalized patients at risk of developing a pressure injury: An observational study

Authors

  • Wendy Chaboyer RN PhD,

    Professor and Director, Corresponding author
    1. NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Nursing Interventions for Hospitalised Patients, Research Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University, Griffith University Gold Coast Campus, Gold Coast, Australia
    • Correspondence: Wendy Chaboyer, NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Nursing Interventions for Hospitalised Patients, Research Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University, Griffith University Gold Coast Campus, Gold Coast, Qld 4222, Australia. Email: w.chaboyer@griffith.edu.au

    Search for more papers by this author
  • Peter M Mills BESc(Hon) PhD,

    Senior Lecturer
    1. Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Griffith Health Institute & School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Shelley Roberts PhD Candidate,

    PhD Student and Dietitian
    1. Research Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Griffith Health Institute & School of Public Health, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sharon Latimer RN PhD Candidate

    Lecturer and PhD Student
    1. Research Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Griffith Health Institute & School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Contributions

    Study Design: WC, PM

    Data Collection and Analysis: WC, PM, SR, SL

    Manuscript Preparation: WC, PM, SR, SL

  • The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Abstract

Pressure injury guidelines recommend regular repositioning yet patients' mobility and repositioning patterns are unknown. An observational study using activity monitors was undertaken to describe the 24 h activity patterns of 84 hospitalized patients at risk of developing a pressure injury. The vast majority of participants' time was spent in the sedentary activity range (94% ± 3%) followed by the light range (5% ± 4 %). Patients changed their posture a median of 94 (interquartile range 48) time in the 24-h period (range 11–154), or ≈ 3.8 times per hour. Although a main focus for pressure injury prevention has been on repositioning, this study shows that patients with restricted mobility are actually moving quite often. Therefore, it might be appropriate to focus more attention on other pressure injury prevention strategies such as adequate nutrition, appropriate support surfaces and good skin care.

Ancillary