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Nursing students' experiences of being video-recorded during examination in a fictive emergency care situation

Authors

  • Anita Nyström RN MSc,

    Lecturer, Corresponding author
    1. Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden
    • Correspondence: Anita Nyström, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Kungsbäcksvägen 47, 801 76 Gävle, Sweden. Email: anita.nystrom@hig.se

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  • Ylva Pålsson RN MSc,

    Lecturer
    1. Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden
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  • Anna Hofsten MD,

    Senior Lecturer
    1. Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden
    2. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences—Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
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  • Elisabeth Häggström RNT PhD

    Senior Lecturer, Associate Professor
    1. Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden
    2. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
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Abstract

Promoting undergraduate nursing students' learning in simulated care can be achieved through dynamic scenario-based training sessions that are documented using simple video equipment. One valuable aspect of this kind of training is the subsequent reflective dialogue that takes place between the teacher and the students during the examination.

The aim of the present paper is to describe bachelor nursing students' experiences of being video-recorded during an examination with a simulated patient in emergency care.

The study was descriptive in design and used a qualitative approach with written answers to open-ended questions; 44 undergraduate nursing students participated.

A latent content analysis resulted in three themes: (i) visualization might cause nervousness at first; (ii) visualization promotes dialogue and acknowledgement; and (iii) visualization promotes increased self-knowledge and professional growth.

The conclusion is that video-recording is a good way for undergraduate nursing students to develop skills in emergency care situations and to understand their own actions; it might also help them increase their self-knowledge.

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