Get access

Focus on Feeding! Evaluation of a framework for maximizing mealtime in aged care facilities

Authors

  • Esther Chang RN BAppSc (Adv. Nur) MEdAdmin PhD,

    Professor of Nursing, Director of Higher Degree Research and Undergraduate Honours Programs, Corresponding author
    1. School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    • Correspondence: Esther Chang, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Western Sydney, Locked bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 2751, Australia. Email: E.Chang@uws.edu.au

    Search for more papers by this author
  • Suzanne Brownhill BSW MPH PhD,

    Research Fellow
    1. School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • John Bidewell BSc (Psych) MPsych (Applied) PhD,

    Lecturer
    1. School of Science and Health, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Amanda Johnson RN DipT(Ng) MHScEd PhD,

    Senior Lecturer, Director of Academic Programs—Undergraduate
    1. School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Shyama Ratnayake RN MAPS (Nutritional Science)

    Research Assistant
    1. School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Author contributions

    EC—study design and manuscript; SB—qualitative data analysis, model design and development, and manuscript; JB—study design, statistical analysis and manuscript; AJ—study design and manuscript; SR—data collection and manuscript.

Abstract

Unintentional weight loss is a health risk for residents of aged care facilities, a concern for families and places demands on nursing staff. An existing weight loss framework to assess and manage residents' weight developed by a multidisciplinary team was implemented and evaluated with nurses and residents in aged care facilities within an area health service of Sydney, Australia. Thematic analysis generated seven binary concepts relating to relational, procedural, behavioural, physical, psychological, environmental and temporal aspects of feeding assistance provided by nurses to residents. Theoretical sampling was applied to the literature confirming those concepts which were organized as a model of feeding assistance labelled the Focus on Feeding! Decision Model.

Nurses can play a pivotal role in the assessment of feeding difficulty and implementation of innovative mealtime programs. The Model aims to promote nurses' critical thinking and decision-making to improve nutritional intake of residents and avoid preventable weight loss.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary