Impact of an educational intervention on hand hygiene compliance and infection rate in a developing country neonatal intensive care unit

Authors

  • Viswas Chhapola MD,

    Postgraduate Researcher, Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pediatrics, Pt. B. D. Sharma Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rohtak, India
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Pediatrics, Lady Hardinge Medical College and Associated Kalawati Saran Children's Hospital, New Delhi, India
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  • Rekha Brar DNB

    Demonstrator
    1. Department of Pharmacology, Pt. B. D. Sharma Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rohtak, India
    Current affiliation:
    1. ESI. PGIMER, Basai Darapur, New Delhi, India
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  • Contribution: Viswas Chhapola planned the study and collected the data and prepared the manuscript. Rekha Brar reviewed the manuscript. Both authors approved the final version of the manuscript.
  • Funding: None.
  • Conflict of interest: None stated.
  • Ethics committee Approval: Project was approved by institutional ethical committee.

Abstract

Nosocomial infections are a significant problem in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and hand hygiene (HH) has been stated as an effective mean to prevent spread of infections. The aim of study was to assess the baseline compliance HH practices and to evaluate the impact of hand washing educational programme on infection rate in a NICU. Continuous surveillance of nosocomial infections was done. A total of 15 797 and 12 929 opportunities for HH were observed in pre-intervention and postintervention phases, respectively. Compliance of health-care workers for all HH opportunities combined was 46% before intervention and improved significantly to 69% in postintervention (RR 1.49, CI 1.46–1.52, P < 0.0001). Compliance for nurses and doctors was similar. Nosocomial sepsis rate showed a significant decline from 96 per 1000 patient-days in pre-intervention to 47 per 1000 patient-days in postintervention phase (RR 0.44, CI 0.33–0.58, P < 0.0001). We conclude that effective HH practices can serve as an economical and effective nosocomial infection control approach especially important in developing nations.

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