Profiling nurses' job satisfaction, acculturation, work environment, stress, cultural values and coping abilities: A cluster analysis

Authors

  • Yong-Shian Goh RN RMN,

    PhD Candidate, Senior Lecturer
    1. Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System, National University of Singapore, Singapore
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  • Alice Lee BSc (Hons),

    Nursing Student
    1. Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System, National University of Singapore, Singapore
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  • Sally Wai-Chi Chan RN PhD,

    Head and Professor
    1. School of Nursing & Midwifery, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia
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  • Moon Fai Chan PhD CStat

    Associate Professor, Corresponding author
    1. Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System, National University of Singapore, Singapore
    • Correspondence: Moon Fai Chan, Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, National University of Singapore, MD11, Level 2, 10 Medical Drive, Singapore 117597, Singapore. Email: nurcmf@nus.edu.sg

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Abstract

This study aimed to determine whether definable profiles existed in a cohort of nursing staff with regard to demographic characteristics, job satisfaction, acculturation, work environment, stress, cultural values and coping abilities. A survey was conducted in one hospital in Singapore from June to July 2012, and 814 full-time staff nurses completed a self-report questionnaire (89% response rate). Demographic characteristics, job satisfaction, acculturation, work environment, perceived stress, cultural values, ways of coping and intention to leave current workplace were assessed as outcomes. The two-step cluster analysis revealed three clusters. Nurses in cluster 1 (n = 222) had lower acculturation scores than nurses in cluster 3. Cluster 2 (n = 362) was a group of younger nurses who reported higher intention to leave (22.4%), stress level and job dissatisfaction than the other two clusters. Nurses in cluster 3 (n = 230) were mostly Singaporean and reported the lowest intention to leave (13.0%). Resources should be allocated to specifically address the needs of younger nurses and hopefully retain them in the profession. Management should focus their retention strategies on junior nurses and provide a work environment that helps to strengthen their intention to remain in nursing by increasing their job satisfaction.

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