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Methodology of a population-based stroke and TIA incidence and outcomes study: The Auckland Regional Community Stroke Study (ARCOS IV) 2011–2012

Authors

  • Rita Krishnamurthi,

    1. Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences, National Institute for Stroke and Applied Neurosciences, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand
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  • Amy Jones,

    1. Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences, National Institute for Stroke and Applied Neurosciences, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand
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  • P Alan Barber,

    1. Centre for Brain Research, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
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  • Suzanne Barker-Collo,

    1. Department of Psychology, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
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  • Kathryn McPherson,

    1. Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences, Person-Centered Rehabilitation Centre, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand
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  • Derrick Bennett,

    1. Clinical Trial Service Unit and Epidemiological Studies Unit, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
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  • Elaine Rush,

    1. Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand
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  • Flora Suh,

    1. Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences, National Institute for Stroke and Applied Neurosciences, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand
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  • Nicola Starkey,

    1. Department of Psychology, Waikato University, Hamilton, New Zealand
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  • Alice Theadom,

    1. Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences, National Institute for Stroke and Applied Neurosciences, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand
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  • Varsha Parag,

    1. National Institute for Health Innovation, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
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  • Yogini Rathnasabapathy,

    1. North Shore Hospital, Waitemata District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand
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  • Valery L. Feigin,

    Corresponding author
    1. Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences, National Institute for Stroke and Applied Neurosciences, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand
    • Correspondence: Valery L Feigin, National Institute for Stroke and Applied Neurosciences, School of Rehabilitation and Occupation Studies, School of Public Health and Psychosocial Studies, Faculty of Health and Environmental Studies, AUT University, AUT North Shore Campus, AA254, 90 Akoranga Dr, Northcote 0627, Private Bag 92006, Auckland 1142, New Zealand.

      E-mail: valery.feigin@aut.ac.nz

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  • and on behalf of the ARCOS IV Programme Group


  • Conflict of interest: None declared.
  • Funding: The study was funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand (10/458).

Abstract

Background

Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Stroke burden is immense as it leads to premature deaths, leaves survivors with ongoing disabilities, and has a major financial impact on the individual, their families, and the community. Reliable, high-quality evidence is needed on stroke risk factors, incidence, and outcomes to provide information on how best to reduce this burden. Population-based studies are regarded as the ‘gold-standard’ of measuring disease burden but are not common due to the logistical and financial challenges they present. The Auckland Regional Community Stroke Studies are among a few in the world that have been carried out at a population level and at regular intervals.

Aim

The aim of the fourth Auckland Regional Community Stroke Studies IV is to examine the current measures of stroke incidence, prevalence, and outcomes as well the trends over four decades. This article describes the methodology of the Auckland Regional Community Stroke Studies IV with stroke and transient ischemic attacks cases registered over a 12-month period from March 1, 2011 to February 29, 2012.

Conclusions

The methodology described may be used as a guide in order to design similar population-based stroke incidence and outcome studies in other countries and populations, thus facilitating the collection of most consistent and accurate stroke epidemiological data.

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