Response to Balta et al. letter

Authors

  • David Calvet,

    Corresponding author
    1. Centre de Psychiatrie et Neurosciences INSERM UMR 894, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France
    2. Department of Neurology, Centre Hospitalier Sainte-Anne, Paris, France
    • Correspondence: David Calvet, INSERM UMR S 894, Neurology Department and Stroke Unit, Sainte-Anne Hospital, Paris Descartes University, 1 rue Cabanis, 75674 Paris Cedex 14, Paris, France. E-mail: d.calvet@ch-sainte-anne.fr

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  • Stéphane Laurent,

    1. Department of Pharmacology and INSERM U970, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Paris, France
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  • Jean-Louis Mas

    1. Centre de Psychiatrie et Neurosciences INSERM UMR 894, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France
    2. Department of Neurology, Centre Hospitalier Sainte-Anne, Paris, France
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Abstract

See the original letter to the editor

Dear editor,

This letter is a reply to the Letter to the Editor, ‘Arterial stiffness in patients with ischemic attack’ that was published in the International Journal of Stroke volume 9 issue 2 [1].

In our study, we showed that measurement of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) improves the prediction of ≥50% asymptomatic coronary artery disease provided by the Framingham Risk Score and the presence of cervicocephalic stenosis in patients aged 45–75 years with nondisabling, noncardioembolic ischemic stroke or TIA [2].

Our findings are consistent with many large epidemiological studies [3-6]. Indeed, several studies have shown that aortic stiffness assessed by PWV is associated with higher cardiovascular event rates in high-risk and community-based samples, and that its predictive value is in addition to traditional vascular risk factor, including Framingham Risk Score [4-6]. The 2013 ESH/ESC guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension pointed out that all available data are a relevant argument in favor of using assessment of arterial stiffness, using PWV, in daily practice [7].

Obviously, identifying patients at high risk of a cardiovascular event still needs to be refined and the potential additional value of other vascular risk factors as discussed by Balta et al. will need to be assessed in large studies.

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