International Labour Review

Cover image for Vol. 152 Issue s1

Special Issue: The International Labour Review and the ILO: Milestones in a Shared History

January 2013

Volume 152, Issue Supplement s1

Pages 1–106

  1. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Original Articles
    1. The International Labour Review and the ILO: Milestones in a shared history (pages 1–12)

      Patrick BOLLÉ

      Version of Record online: 1 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1564-913X.2013.00156.x

      As the ILO is approaching its 100th anniversary, so is the International Labour Review. By way of introduction to this retrospective Special Supplement, which reproduces a number of articles written for the Review by winners of the Nobel Peace Prize or the Nobel Prize for economics, the author looks back at the journal's history, recalling its early days since the 1919 Treaty of Versailles, its subsequent development, broadening international readership and adaptation to the digital age. He concludes with a brief presentation of the selected authors and their work, which is considered in the context of current research and debate.

    2. The work of the Geneva Conference (pages 13–18)

      Léon JOUHAUX

      Version of Record online: 1 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1564-913X.2013.00157.x

      Léon Jouhaux was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1951. He devoted "a long life of work and struggle to elevate the working classes - and first of all to improve their conditions. He is here because from his earliest years he has time after time thrown himself into the fight for peace and against war".

    3. Economic recovery and labour market problems in Sweden: II (pages 19–35)

      Bertil OHLIN

      Version of Record online: 1 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1564-913X.2013.00158.x

      In 1935, the world's wealthiest countries were experiencing the worst of the economic crisis, victims of deflation and mass unemployment. Yet in Sweden, the recession had been less serious, and the recovery faster. Why? This question aroused considerable interest at the time. In the article reproduced here, Bertil Ohlin, who Special Supplement The International Labour Review and the ILO : Milestones in a shared history had written reports on the global crisis and on unemployment in Sweden - and later received the Nobel Prize for economics

    4. Mr Keynes' “General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money” (pages 36–46)

      Abba P. LERNER

      Version of Record online: 1 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1564-913X.2013.00159.x

      The article by Abba P. Lerner reproduced here was the first to explain Keynes' employment theory in simple and generally intelligible terms; indeed, the article had been read and approved by Keynes prior to publication. Born in Romania, Abba P. Lerner studied in Cambridge before teaching at a number of universities including the London School of Economics and the University of California (Berkeley).

    5. A programme for family security in Sweden (pages 47–58)

      Alva MYRDAL

      Version of Record online: 1 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1564-913X.2013.00160.x

      In addition to its prescient economic policy in the early 1930s, Sweden is notable for the policy of family support it adopted. Alva Myrdal - who was later awarded the Nobel Peace Prize - was closely associated with the development of a population policy in Sweden. In the article reproduced here, she explains the particular concerns in Sweden and the nature of the policy recommended and applied.

    6. The maintenance of full employment after the transition period: A comparison of the problem in the United States and United Kingdom (pages 59–65)

      Michal KALECKI

      Version of Record online: 1 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1564-913X.2013.00161.x

      Michal Kalecki was a Polish economist whose contributions to macroeconomics influenced Keynesian economists. After studying civil engineering in Warsaw and Gdansk, Kalecki began his career at the Research Institute of Business Cycles and Prices in Warsaw. He later worked at the Oxford Institute of Statistics, where he developed his pre-Keynesian ide...

    7. The causes of unemployment in less developed countries and some research topics (pages 66–73)

      W. Arthur LEWIS

      Version of Record online: 1 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1564-913X.2013.00162.x

      W. Arthur Lewis was born on the island of St Lucia. He taught political economics at several universities and worked at the United Nations in the 1950s, before embarking on a career at Princeton. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for economics in 1979, jointly with T. W. Schultz, for their work on development economics.

    8. Trade policy and employment growth (pages 74–80)

      Jan TINBERGEN

      Version of Record online: 1 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1564-913X.2013.00163.x

      At the end of 1969, Jan Tinbergen, who received the Nobel Prize for economics that same year, participated in a meeting to advise the ILO on research priorities for its newly created World Employment Programme. His presentation dealt with international trade policy and its effects on job creation.

    9. Work and rights (pages 81–92)

      Amartya SEN

      Version of Record online: 1 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1564-913X.2013.00164.x

      Awarded the Nobel Prize for economics in 1998, Sen is a creative author who explores the boundaries between economics and philosophy. In 1975, he wrote a seminal study on employment for the ILO, entitled Employment, technology and development: A study prepared for the ILO within the framework of the World Employment Programme. This work served as the basis for his article "Employment, institutions and technology: Some policy issues", which was published in the International Labour Revi...

    10. The global crisis, social protection and jobs (pages 93–106)

      Joseph STIGLITZ

      Version of Record online: 1 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1564-913X.2013.00165.x

      In 2001, Joseph Stiglitz was awarded the Nobel Prize for economics. In 2002, he published an article in the Review (Vol. 141, No. 1-2) entitled "Employment, social justice and societal well-being" in which he proposes that the purpose of economic activity is to improve the well-being of individuals, and that employment is essential to this well-being. In this regard, his description of the negative effects of unemployment echoes that given in the abovementioned article by Amartya S...

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