Adoptive immunotherapy with genetically modified lymphocytes in allogeneic stem cell transplantation

Authors

  • Nicoletta Cieri,

    1. University Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy
    2. Experimental Hematology Unit, Division of Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cells and Gene Therapy, PIBIC, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy
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  • Sara Mastaglio,

    1. Experimental Hematology Unit, Division of Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cells and Gene Therapy, PIBIC, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy
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  • Giacomo Oliveira,

    1. University Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy
    2. Experimental Hematology Unit, Division of Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cells and Gene Therapy, PIBIC, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy
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  • Monica Casucci,

    1. Experimental Hematology Unit, Division of Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cells and Gene Therapy, PIBIC, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy
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  • Attilio Bondanza,

    1. Experimental Hematology Unit, Division of Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cells and Gene Therapy, PIBIC, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy
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  • Chiara Bonini

    Corresponding author
    1. Experimental Hematology Unit, Division of Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cells and Gene Therapy, PIBIC, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy
    • Correspondence to:

      Chiara Bonini

      Experimental Hematology Unit

      San Raffaele Scientific Institute

      via Olgettina 60

      Milano 20131, Italy

      Tel.: +390226434790

      Fax: +390226434790

      e-mail: bonini.chiara@hsr.it

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Summary

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from a healthy donor (allo-HSCT) represents the most potent form of cellular adoptive immunotherapy to treat malignancies. In allo-HSCT, donor T cells are double edge-swords: highly potent against residual tumor cells, but potentially highly toxic, and responsible for graft versus host disease (GVHD), a major clinical complication of transplantation. Gene transfer technologies coupled with current knowledge on cancer immunology have generated a wide range of approaches aimed at fostering the immunological response to cancer cells, while avoiding or controlling GVHD. In this review, we discuss cell and gene therapy approaches currently tested in preclinical models and in clinical trials.

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