Successful Word Recognition by 10-Month-Olds Given Continuous Speech Both at Initial Exposure and Test

Authors

  • Caroline Junge,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Amsterdam
    • Correspondence should be sent to Caroline Junge, Developmental Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Weesperplein 4, 1018 XN Amsterdam, The Netherlands. E-mail: cmm.junge@gmail.com

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  • Anne Cutler,

    1. MARCS Institute, University of Western Sydney
    2. Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics
    3. Donders Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen
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  • Peter Hagoort

    1. Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics
    2. Donders Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen
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Abstract

Most words that infants hear occur within fluent speech. To compile a vocabulary, infants therefore need to segment words from speech contexts. This study is the first to investigate whether infants (here: 10-month-olds) can recognize words when both initial exposure and test presentation are in continuous speech. Electrophysiological evidence attests that this indeed occurs: An increased extended negativity (word recognition effect) appears for familiarized target words relative to control words. This response proved constant at the individual level: Only infants who showed this negativity at test had shown such a response, within six repetitions after first occurrence, during familiarization.

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