New Zealand nurses’ views on preceptoring international nurses

Authors

  • H. Riden RN, MN,

    Senior Lecturer
    1. School of Nursing, Eastern Institute of Technology, Napier, New Zealand
    Search for more papers by this author
  • S. Jacobs RN, PhD,

    Dean
    1. Faculty of Health Sciences, Eastern Institute of Technology, Napier, New Zealand
    Search for more papers by this author
  • B. Marshall PhD

    Professor, Corresponding author
    1. Faculty of Health Sciences, Eastern Institute of Technology, Napier, New Zealand
    • Correspondence address: Bob Marshall, Faculty of Health Sciences, Eastern Institute of Technology, PB 1201 Hawke's Bay Mail Centre, Napier 4142, New Zealand; Tel: +64 6 9748000; Fax: +64 6 9748976; E-mail: bmarshall@eit.ac.nz.

    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Background

New Zealand encourages internationally educated nurses to seek registration in New Zealand to reduce local nursing shortages. Internationally educated nurses must meet requirements of the Health Practitioners Competency Assurance Act 2003, and demonstrate competency to practise through a clinical competency assessment programme.

Aim

The purpose was to establish whether preceptors believe they are adequately prepared to assess nurses for whom English is a second language, and to determine the support and recognition received in the role.

Methods

Preceptor training, workload, understanding of ethical and legal accountability, and perceived organizational values, support and attitudes were evaluated via an anonymous internet survey.

Results

Some preceptors do not meet Nursing Council of New Zealand standards and some work environments require nurses to preceptor international nurses. Many nurses believe the role is not valued despite the high workload requirements. Training increased preceptor confidence and preparedness for clinical assessment but additional education is required to understand ethical and legal accountability within the role. Many preceptors indicated they felt pressured into recording assessments they were uncomfortable with.

Discussion

Enhancing preceptorship acceptance could be achieved through institutional recognition of the role's value via workload consideration, institutional recognition or financial means. Increased preceptorship training, particularly around ethical and legal issues, would encourage preceptor confidence.

Conclusions

Organizations must find ways of meeting these challenges while recognizing they are responsible for the work environment of both preceptors and internationally registered nurses for whom English is a second language. A register of preceptors could provide a platform for audit and quality assurance principles, ensuring adequate education and preparation of preceptors.

Implications for nursing and health policy

Effective preceptorship requires training, recognition and support. Successful integration of international nurses depends on organizational recognition and implementation of these factors.

Ancillary