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An assessment of diabetes-related knowledge among registered nurses working in hospitals in Jordan

Authors

  • M.I. Yacoub RN, PhD,

    Assistant Professor, Corresponding author
    1. Faculty of Nursing – Clinical Nursing Department, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan
    • Correspondence address: Mohammed I. Yacoub, Faculty of Nursing – Clinical Nursing Department, The University of Jordan, Amman 11942, Jordan; Tel: +962 6 5355000 Ext. 23141; Fax: +962 6 5300244; E-mail: m.yacoub@ju.edu.jo.

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  • W.M. Demeh RN, PhD,

    Assistant Professor
    1. Faculty of Nursing – Clinical Nursing Department, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan
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  • M.W. Darawad RN, PhD,

    Associate Professor
    1. Faculty of Nursing – Clinical Nursing Department, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan
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  • J.L. Barr MSN, RN-BC, CDE,

    Certified Diabetes Educator
    1. Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USA
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  • A.M. Saleh RN, PhD,

    Assistant Professor
    1. Faculty of Nursing – Clinical Nursing Department, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan
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  • M.Y. Saleh RN, PhD

    Associate Professor
    1. Faculty of Nursing – Clinical Nursing Department, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan
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  • Source of funding: This work was supported by the Deanship of Academic Research, The University of Jordan.
  • Conflict of Interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Abstract

Background

Nurses play a vital role in caring for people with diabetes where knowledge constitutes the cornerstone of this care.

Aim

This study assessed the level of Jordanian nurses' perceived and actual knowledge of diabetes and examined the relationship between nurses' actual knowledge of diabetes and their different characteristics.

Methods

A cross-sectional descriptive design was used to report knowledge regarding diabetes. Registered nurses were asked to complete self-administered questionnaires. The Diabetes Self-Report Tool and the Modified Diabetes Basic Knowledge Test were used to assess nurses' perceived and actual knowledge of diabetes.

Results

A total of 277 out of the 450 eligible registered nurses accepted to participate and returned questionnaires from seven hospitals in Jordan. Nurses in this study mostly demonstrated a knowledge deficit in clinical and theoretical-based topics, such as initial treatment of hypoglycaemia, insulin storage and preparation; meal planning and duration of action with hypoglycaemic agents. Nurses' actual knowledge of diabetes was positively correlated with their perceived knowledge, perceived competence and level of education.

Limitations

Study participants were selected using convenience sampling. The length of time needed for nurses exceeded 50 min to complete study questionnaires.

Conclusions

This study examined current knowledge among Jordanian registered nurses regarding diabetes. A knowledge deficit regarding diabetes was demonstrated by the nurses who participated in this study. The role of continuing education is essential to supporting nurses' knowledge of complex clinical conditions, such as diabetes. Adequate implementation and dissemination of evidence-based guidelines on caring for people with diabetes is a prerequisite to improve the nurses' knowledge.

Implication for Nursing and Health Policy

Promoting continuing education in diabetes for nurses requires continuous effort and creativity. Healthcare system administrators must acknowledge and prioritize the need for this education.

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