Overweight and dental caries: the association among German children

Authors

  • Ghalib Qadri,

    Corresponding author
    1. Preventive and Pediatric Dentistry Department, University of Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany
    2. Al-Hada Military Hospital, Taif, Saudi Arabia
    • Correspondence to:

      Dr. Ghalib Qadri, Preventive & Pediatric Dentistry Unit, Al-Hada Military Hospitals, P.O. Box. 1347, Taif 21944, KSA. E-mail: al_qadry@yahoo.com

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  • Mohammed Alkilzy,

    1. Preventive and Pediatric Dentistry Department, University of Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany
    2. Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University of Aleppo, Aleppo, Syria
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  • You-Shan Feng,

    1. Community Medicine Department, University of Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany
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  • Christian Splieth

    1. Preventive and Pediatric Dentistry Department, University of Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany
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Abstract

Objectives

The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between iso-body mass index (iso-BMI) and both dental caries status and caries increment among German school children.

Methods

Six hundred and ninety-four students (age range 9–12 years, mean 10.34 ± 0.56, 48% females) were recruited from the fifth grade of 18 primary schools. Weight, height, and oral health data number of decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) as well as parent/legal guardian questionnaire (measuring SES) were collected during school dental examination at baseline and after one and a half-year follow-up. The body mass index (BMI) was calculated using the international classification system for childhood overweight and obesity (iso-BMI). Statistical analyses were performed using Poisson regression models.

Results

Iso-BMI was significantly associated with dental caries prevalence and severity in the permanent dentition (= 0.039). Low-normal weight children had a lower mean DMFT (0.56) than did overweight/obese children (0.70). In addition, a border-line significant association was found between overweight/obese children and caries increment (= 0.055).

Conclusion

Although iso-BMI was associated with dental caries prevalence and severity, the association between caries increment and iso-BMI did not reach a statistical significance. Overweight/obese children however acquired more additional carious lesions during the follow-up period than children with low-normal weight.

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