Antenatal and intrapartum antecedents of cerebral palsy: a case-control study

Authors

  • Janet Walstab,

    1. Department of Child Development and Rehabilitation, Royal Children's Hospital and Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville
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  • Robin Bell,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Perinatal Medicine and University of Melbourne Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
      Address for correspondence
      Dr Robin Bell
      Department of Perinatal Medicine
      The Royal Women's Hospital
      132 Grattan Street Carlton
      Victoria Australia 3053
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  • Dinah Reddihough,

    1. Department of Child Development and Rehabilitation, Royal Children's Hospital and Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville
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  • Shaun Brennecke,

    1. Department of Perinatal Medicine and University of Melbourne Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • Christine Bessell,

    1. Royal Women's Hospital, Carlton; Monash Medical Centre, Clayton
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  • Norman Beischer

    1. Medical Research Foundation for Women and Babies, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • Janet Walstab Research Assistant, Robin Bell Perinatal Epidemiologist, Dinah Reddihough Director, Shaun Brennecke Professor and Director, Christine Bessell Medical Director, Norman Beischer Director

Address for correspondence
Dr Robin Bell
Department of Perinatal Medicine
The Royal Women's Hospital
132 Grattan Street Carlton
Victoria Australia 3053

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Aim

To identify antenatal and intrapartum factors contributing to the aetiology of cerebral palsy (CP).

Methods

A case-control study using moderate/severe cases of cerebral palsy identified from the Victorian Cerebral Palsy Register and two controls per case identified through the Victorian Perinatal Data Collection Unit.

Results

A number of previously identified risk factors for CP were confirmed in our data. New observations were (in specific sub-groups): protective effects of mother's negative Rhesus status, cigarette smoking at the first visit and episiotomy and an increased risk of CP associated with an abnormal antenatal cardiotocograph.

Conclusions

Although the result of the deliberate investigation of specific aspects of the antenatal and intrapartum period identified from a pilot study, our new findings must be interpreted with caution as they were not all based on specific a priori hypotheses, although some had been examined by other investigators. We would encourage their evaluation in other data sets.

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