From aggressiveness to creativity

Authors


Abstract

Abstract:  Psychology has a long tradition of considering human creativity as a distinct human characteristic and a special kind of human activity. After explaining the key motives for such an attitude, the author discusses those forms of healthy aggressiveness that stand out as necessary and constitutive elements of the creative process.

Taking the well-known statement of C. G. Jung's ‘The person who does not build (create), will demolish and destroy’ as a starting point, the author compares the basic premises for understanding the process of human creativity, at the same time drawing on Freud's psychology of the individual and Jung's principle of the collective unconscious as well as his notion of ‘complexes’. In doing so, the author somewhat boldly paraphrases Jung's dictum: ‘In order to be creative, rather than just constructive, one must occasionally also destroy’.

With reference to Wallas, Taylor and Neumann (Wallas 1926; Taylor 1959; ;Neumann 2001), the author goes on to explore those concepts which help us to investigate the phenomenon of human creativity, drawing distinctions between emergent, expressive, productive, inventive and innovative creativity.

The second part of the article discusses the importance of intelligence, originality, nonconformity, subversiveness and free-mindedness for the creative process of human beings. The author concludes with a further explanation of Erich Neumann's argument that human creativity cannot be understood solely as a result of sociogenetic factors, and argues that it is only by taking into consideration Jung's perception of creativity that a global ontological understanding of these processes can be achieved.

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