Personality and Dutch Emigrants' Reactions to Acculturation Strategies

Authors

  • Winny Bakker,

    1. Department of Social and Organizational Psychology, University of Groningen, Roningen, The Netherlands
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    • 1Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Winny Bakker, Department of Social and Organizational Psychology, Grote Kruisstraat 2/1, 9712 TS Groningen, The Netherlands. E-mail: W.Bakker@ppsw.rug.nl

  • Karen Van Der Zee,

    1. Department of Social and Organizational Psychology, University of Groningen, Roningen, The Netherlands
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  • Jan Pieter Van Oudenhoven

    1. Department of Social and Organizational Psychology, University of Groningen, Roningen, The Netherlands
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Abstract

This experimental questionnaire study examined individual differences in affective and normative reactions to acculturation strategies. A sample of 265 Dutch emigrants with a dual cultural background read scenarios describing the experiences of an emigrant. Eight (4 × 2) different scenario versions were developed, each referring to 1 of 4 acculturation strategies (Berry, 1997) and representing either the Frisian or the Dutch native culture. Participants reacted most positively to the integration strategy. There were no differences in reactions to Frisian or Dutch original culture. With respect to the influence of personality, as measured with the Multicultural Personality Questionnaire (van der Zee & van Oudenhoven, 2000), individuals high in flexibility responded more positively to the assimilation strategy than did individuals who scored low on this dimension.

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