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An Allee effect at the front of a plant invasion: Spartina in a Pacific estuary

Authors

  • Heather G. Davis,

    Corresponding author
    1. Population Biology Graduate Group, 2320 Storer Hall, University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA,
    2. Bodega Marine Laboratory, Box 247, Bodega Bay, CA 94923–0247, USA
      Heather G. Davis (tel. +1 530 754 6456; fax +1 530 752 1449; e-mail hgdavis@ucdavis.edu).
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  • Caz M. Taylor,

    1. Ecology Graduate Group, 2132 Wickson Hall, University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA,
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  • Janie C. Civille,

    1. Ecology Graduate Group, 2320 Storer Hall, University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA,
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  • Donald R. Strong

    1. Section of Evolution and Ecology, 2320 Storer Hall, University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA, and
    2. Bodega Marine Laboratory, Box 247, Bodega Bay, CA 94923–0247, USA
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Heather G. Davis (tel. +1 530 754 6456; fax +1 530 752 1449; e-mail hgdavis@ucdavis.edu).

Summary

  • 1Spartina alterniflora sets very little viable seed at the leading edges of an invasion in Willapa Bay, Washington, USA, where it was introduced c. 100 years ago. This largely outbreeding, rhizomatous grass recruits into previously unoccupied areas at low density, so young plants initially grow isolated from one another but eventually coalesce to form continuous meadows.
  • 2Isolated recruits set approximately one-tenth the seed of meadow plants at five sites, spread over the 230 km2 of Willapa Bay mudflats, and this seed germinated at only one-third the rate observed in meadow plants.
  • 3The consistent patterns suggested that the low seed set in the isolated plants was largely due to the demographic effects of density. Differences between sites in the incidence and amount of seed set and germination rate indicated, however, that there was some environmental influence.
  • 4These data imply that plants in newly invaded, low-density areas produce little viable seed until rhizomatous growth brings them into close contact. This Allee effect could substantially reduce the rate of invasion.

Ancillary