Skin darkness is related to cortisol, but not MSH, content in post-larval Solea senegalensis

Authors

  • N. M. Ruane,

    Corresponding author
    1. Aquaculture Research Group, Centre for Marine Science (CCMAR), Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-117 Faro, Portugal and
      †Aquaculture Development Centre, Department of Zoology, Cooperage Building, National University of Ireland, Cork, Ireland. Tel.: +353 21 4904542; fax: +353 21 4904593; email: n.ruane@ucc.ie
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  • P. Makridis,

    1. Aquaculture Research Group, Centre for Marine Science (CCMAR), Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-117 Faro, Portugal and
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  • P. H. M. Balm,

    1. Department of Ecophysiology, Faculty of Biology, University of Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen, The Netherlands
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  • M. T. Dinis

    1. Aquaculture Research Group, Centre for Marine Science (CCMAR), Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-117 Faro, Portugal and
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†Aquaculture Development Centre, Department of Zoology, Cooperage Building, National University of Ireland, Cork, Ireland. Tel.: +353 21 4904542; fax: +353 21 4904593; email: n.ruane@ucc.ie

Abstract

In this study it was shown that dark coloured post-larvae of Senegalese sole Solea senegalensis, at two different ages, had elevated cortisol concentrations compared with lighter coloured individuals. As melanophore-stimulating hormone levels were not elevated in dark coloured fish, it is possible that this hormone may not be the main melanotropic hormone involved in stress-related skin darkening.

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