GEOGRAPHY ON THE PLANETS: GIFT OF REMOTE SENSING*

Authors

  • Richard J. Pike

    1. RICHARD J. PIKE is Geologist, MIS 946, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025. His training included a geography M.A. He works in quantitative terrain analysis and planetary geomorphology and currently is experimenting with automated mapping of landslide hazards from digital elevation models.
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  • *

    This paper stems from conversations with N.M. Short and R.G. Craig. H.J. Moore made many essential contributions, particularly in the discussions of radar and spectral reflectance. L.J. Gaydos, John E. Estes and John R. Jensen kindly reviewed the manuscript and made excellent suggestions. I dedicate this paper to the memory of Raymond E. Murphy, late of Clark University.

Abstract

Extraterrestrial geography has become a reality, as we move from Earth's moon to the planets. A broad-scale regional physiography is being established on twenty planets and satellites through remote sensing techniques. Spacecraft images yield most of the information on Solar System landscapes. Topographic measurements are extracted by monoscopic image-processing, stereophotogrammetry, and radar analysis. Invisible parts of the spectrum furnish non-topographic data.

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