A GEOGRAPHY OF THE VENTURE CAPITAL INDUSTRY IN THE U. S.*

Authors

  • Thomas R. Leinbach,

    1. THOMAS R. LEINBACH (Ph.D., Pennsylvania State) is a Professor in Geography and the Patterson School of International Affairs, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0027. His research interests focus on economic development in the U.S. and urbanization and transport development in Southeast Asia.
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  • Carl Amrhein

    1. . CARL AMRHEIN (Ph.D., SUNY-Buffalo) is Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S1A1, Canada. His current research interests include computer applications, quantitative methods, labor migration and topics in economic geography.
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  • *

    The authors wish to acknowledge the assistance of Donald W. Jones, Energy Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN in the development of the paper. In addition Professor Leinbach acknowledges a faculty award from the University of Kentucky Research Foundation in support of this research. The figure was drawn in the University of Kentucky, Department of Geography Cartographic Laboratory.

Abstract

The venture capital industry in the U.S. has important implications for the growth of “high tech”industries and the viability of the small firm sector. Venture capital is provided largely through independent firms, quasi-public Small Business Investment Corporations (SBICs) and corporate subsidiaries. The regional distribution of VC firms has changed over time but New York, Massachusetts, and California account for one-half of the current firms. An analysis of regional flows of VC investment reveals that California, Massachusetts and Texas were the leading recipient states while the Plains region receives the least amount of capital. Given the concentrations of VC activity, a regional mismatch in the supply of and demand for such funds may exist. The investment needs of small firms, the employment impacts of the VC industry, and the matching of VC supply and demand are seen as useful research directions.

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