DUN AND BRADSTREET'S MARKET IDENTIFIERS AND ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY*

Authors

  • Alex Schwartz

    1. ALEX SCHWARTL is a doctoral candidate in Urban Planning and Policy Development, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, where he is also a Research Associate at the Center for Urban Policy Research. He is currently completing a dissertation on the role ot producer services within the New York metropolitan region.
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  • *

    An earlier version of this paper was presented at the 1986 annual meeting of the Association of American Geographers, Minneapolis, MN. I am grateful to Robert Lake and George Sternlieb for their suggestions and comments.

Abstract

An increasing number of studies of business start-ups, closings, and relocations rely on a single data base, DUNS Market Identifiers. This data file to U.S. business establishments provides researchers with essential information about individual firms and establishments. It also exhibits serveral idiosyncracies and requires careful consideration of the meaning of such basic terms as “location”and “firm.”Drawing from a recent survey of 500 New Jersey firms. I consider some of the methodological amd conceptual issues Dun and Bradstreet data pose for industrial location analysts. The Dun and Bradstreet listings exaggerate the exaggerate the incidence and magnitude of establishment openings and closing.

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