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Coping Behaviors, Parenting, and Perceptions of Children's Internalizing and Externalizing Problems in Rural African American Mothers

Authors

  • Mia Smith Bynum,

    Corresponding author
      *Dr. Mia Smith Bynum, Department of Psychological Sciences, Purdue University, 703 Third Street, 1130B, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (msbynum@psych.purdue.edu). Dr. Gene H. Brody is affiliated with the University of Georgia.
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  • Gene H. Brody


*Dr. Mia Smith Bynum, Department of Psychological Sciences, Purdue University, 703 Third Street, 1130B, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (msbynum@psych.purdue.edu). Dr. Gene H. Brody is affiliated with the University of Georgia.

Abstract

Abstract: We tested a hypothetical model linking maternal education and maternal coping behavior with parent-child relationship quality, and in turn, children's self-regulatory behavior and mental health difficulties. Consistent with predictions, mothers’ use of active coping behaviors predicted more positive parent-child relationship quality, greater child self-regulatory behavior, and fewer perceived behavioral and emotional difficulties in children. Implications of these findings for intervention with rural African American mothers are discussed.

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