Comparisons of Motivation, Health Behaviors, and Functional Status Among Elders in Residential Homes in Korea

Authors


  • Rhayun Song is Associate Professor, Department of Nursing, Soonchunhyang University, ChonAn, South Korea. Kyung Ja June is Associate Professor, Department of Nursing, Soonchunhyang University, ChonAn, South Korea. Chun Gill Kim is Associate Professor, Department of Nursing, Hallym University, Chuncheon-Si, South Korea. Mi Yang Jeon is Associate Professor, Department of Nursing, Kuk Dong College Eum-seong-gun, South Korea.

Kyung Ja June, 366-1 SsangYong-Dong, Department of Nursing, Soonchunhyang University, ChonAn 330-090, South Korea. E-mail: kjajune@sch.ac.kr

Abstract

Abstract  This study compared the changes in health behaviors, motivation, and functional status between motivation enhancement exercise-program participants and program dropouts over 6 months. A total of 73 older adults living in residential homes participated in the study. Face-to-face interviews were conducted at pretest and then at 10 weeks and 6 months in the program. The participants exercised using traditional Korean dance movements for 50 min, 4 times per week, for 6 months. The subjects were classified as participants or dropouts by using a cutoff attendance rate of 80%. Repeated ANOVA revealed the following results over 6 months:

  • 1The motivation to perform health behaviors, especially for perceived benefits, improved significantly for the participants than for the dropouts.
  • 2Significant differences in the performance of overall health behaviors and exercise-related behaviors were found between the participants and the dropouts.
  • 3The sickness impact profile (SIP) of the participants improved significantly, compared with the dropouts. Significant group differences were found for total SIP, physical dimensions, and enjoyment of recreation and pastimes.

In conclusion, the study found that the 6-month motivation enhancement program was effective in motivating older adults to perform health behaviors and to improve their functional status.

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