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Student Nurses Participate in Public Health Research and Practice Through a School-Based Screening Program

Authors


  • Christine A. Brosnan, Dr.P.H., R.N., Nursing Systems Department, School of Nursing, University of Texas Health Science Center-Houston, Houston, Texas. Sandra L. Upchurch, Ph.D., C.D.E., R.N., Nursing Systems Department, School of Nursing, University of Texas Health Science Center-Houston, Houston, Texas. Janet C. Meininger, Ph.D., FAAN, R.N., Nursing Systems Department, School of Nursing, University of Texas Health Science Center-Houston, Houston, Texas. Lynne E. Hester, M.S., R.N.C., C.N.S., Nursing Systems Department, School of Nursing, University of Texas Health Science Center-Houston, Houston, Texas. Gwen Johnson, M.Ed., R.N., Aldine Independent School District, Houston, Texas. Mona A. Eissa, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center-Houston, Houston, Texas.

* Dr. Christine A. Brosnan, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, University of Texas Health Science Center-Houston, 6901 Bertner Street, Suite 711, Houston, TX 77030. E-mail: christine.a.brosnan@uth.tmc.edu

Abstract

Abstract  Obesity has reached epidemic proportions among children in minority populations, placing them at risk for diabetes and hypertension. The importance of educating a generation of nurses who have the knowledge, skills, and passion to address this public health need is crucial to the profession and to America's health. This article describes the use of a Community Partnership Model to frame baccalaureate nursing students' (B.S.N.) service learning within the context of a research study to screen middle- and high-school students for health risks. The missions of education, research, and practice are linked together in the model by three processes: evidence-based practice, service learning, and scholarly teaching. The aim of the project was early identification of obesity, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes and their predictors in a high-risk student population, between 12 and 19 years of age. Early evidence indicates that the model is feasible and effective for directing student learning and addressing public health problems in the community.

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