Interaction between the neuromagnetic responses to sound energy onset and pitch onset suggests common generators

Authors

  • A. Seither-Preisler,

    1. Department of Experimental Audiology, ENT Clinic, Münster University Hospital, Kardinal-von-Galen-Ring 10, D-48149 Münster, Germany
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  • K. Krumbholz,

    1. Department of Experimental Audiology, ENT Clinic, Münster University Hospital, Kardinal-von-Galen-Ring 10, D-48149 Münster, Germany
    2. Institute of Medicine, Research Centre Jülich, D-52425 Jülich, Germany
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  • R. Patterson,

    1. Centre for the Neural Basis of Hearing, Department of Physiology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, CB2 3EG Cambridge, UK
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  • S. Seither,

    1. Department of Experimental Audiology, ENT Clinic, Münster University Hospital, Kardinal-von-Galen-Ring 10, D-48149 Münster, Germany
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  • B. Lütkenhöner

    1. Department of Experimental Audiology, ENT Clinic, Münster University Hospital, Kardinal-von-Galen-Ring 10, D-48149 Münster, Germany
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: Dr A. Seither-Preisler, as above.
E-mail: preisler@uni-muenster.de

Abstract

The pitch-onset response (POR) is a negative component of the auditory evoked field which is elicited when the temporal fine structure of a continuous noise is regularized to produce a pitch perception without altering the gross spectral characteristics of the sound. Previously, we showed that the latency of the POR is inversely related to the pitch value and its amplitude is correlated with the salience of the pitch, suggesting that the underlying generators are part of a pitch-processing network [Krumbholz, K., Patterson, R.D., Seither-Preisler, A., Lammertmann, C. & Lütkenhöner, B. (2003) Cereb. Cortex,13, 765–772]. The source of the POR was located near the medial part of Heschl's gyrus. The present study was designed to determine whether the POR originates from the same generators as the energy-onset response (EOR) represented by the N100m/P200m complex. The EOR to the onset of a noise, and the POR to a subsequent transition from noise to pitch, were recorded as the time interval between the noise onset and the transition varied from 500 to 4000 ms. The mean amplitude of the POR increased by ≈ 5.9 nA.m with each doubling of the time between noise onset and transition. This suggests an interaction between the POR and the EOR, which may be based on common neural generators.

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