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Regeneration in MRL mice: further genetic loci controlling the ear hole closure trait using MRL and M.m. Castaneus mice

Authors

  • Ellen Heber-Katz PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. From the Wistar Institutea, and Department of Microbiology and Immunologyb, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
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  • a Pan Chen Bs,

    1. From the Wistar Institutea, and Department of Microbiology and Immunologyb, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
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  • a Lise Clark Dvm PhD,

    1. From the Wistar Institutea, and Department of Microbiology and Immunologyb, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
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  • a Xiang-Ming Zhang Bs,

    1. From the Wistar Institutea, and Department of Microbiology and Immunologyb, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
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  • a Scott Troutman,

    1. From the Wistar Institutea, and Department of Microbiology and Immunologyb, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
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  • and b Elizabeth P. Blankenhorn PhD b

    1. From the Wistar Institutea, and Department of Microbiology and Immunologyb, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
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* Ellen Heber-Katz, PhD, The Wistar Institute, 3601 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104. Fax: (215) 898-3868; Email: heberkatz@wistar.upenn.edu.

Abstract

The MRL mouse has been shown to display an epimorphic regenerative response after ear hole punching leading to complete closure within 30 days and cartilage regrowth. The regenerative capacity of the MRL has also been seen after a severe cryoinjury to the heart leads to complete healing without scarring and functional myocardium. The wound healing ear hole closure response that occurs in MRL mice has been shown to be genetically controlled. We have previously identified 11 quantitative trait loci (QTL) that govern healing in an intercross of (MRL × C57BL/6 J) mice. However, it is desirable to use another poorly healing mouse strain to elucidate the full range of genetic factors that affect this important process. In the current study, we have used an inbred subspecies of the mouse, M. castaneus, and have confirmed a number of loci identified previously. In addition, we report three new healing QTL. Furthermore, in this strain combination, we note a strong sexual dimorphism also observed in the MRL × C57BL/6 cross, both in the healing trait and in the QTL that control it.

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