Cosmopoliteness in the Internet Age

Authors

  • Leo W. Jeffres,

    Corresponding author
    1. (Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1976) is Professor in the School of Communication at Cleveland State University. His interests include media effects, neighborhoods and urban communication systems, communication technologies and political communication.
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  • David J. Atkin,

    Corresponding author
    1. (Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1988) is Visiting Professor at University of Connecticut and Professor of Communication at Cleveland State University. His research interests include telecommunication uses and policy, audience analysis and media effects
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  • Cheryl Campanella Bracken,

    Corresponding author
    1. (Ph.D., Temple University, 2000) is Assistant Professor in the School of Communication at Cleveland State University. Her interests include psychological processing of media with a emphasis on the concept of presence, media effects, and communication technologies
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  • Kimberly A. Neuendorf

    Corresponding author
    1. (Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1982) is Professor in the School of Communication at Cleveland State University. Her research interests include media and race/ethnicity, new media technologies, and affective correlates of media use.
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Abstract

The concept of cosmopoliteness previously has been associated with the diffusion of innovations. Previous research suggests that cosmopolites are earlier adopters of innovations (e.g., new media technologies) and that they use more diverse media sources. This paper details the history of the concept and identifies eight dimensions. Two surveys were employed to investigate the relationship between the concept of cosmopoliteness and new media technology usage. The results indicate that most Internet use behaviors are positively associated with cosmopoliteness. However, this pattern was not found for other media applications such as e-mail and watching DVDs. Implications of study findings are discussed.

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