Glacial history of high alpine Ranunculus glacialis (Ranunculaceae) in the European Alps in a comparative phylogeographical context

Authors

  • PETER SCHÖNSWETTER,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Plant Chorology and Vegetation Science, Institute of Botany, University of Vienna, Rennweg 14, A-1030 Vienna, Austria
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  • ANDREAS TRIBSCH,

    1. Department of Systematics and Evolution of Higher Plants, Institute of Botany, University of Vienna, Rennweg 14, A-1030 Vienna, Austria
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  • IVANA STEHLIK,

    1. Institute of Systematic Botany, University of Zurich, Zollikerstrasse 107, CH-8008 Zurich, Switzerland and Department of Botany, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 3B2
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  • HARALD NIKLFELD

    1. Department of Plant Chorology and Vegetation Science, Institute of Botany, University of Vienna, Rennweg 14, A-1030 Vienna, Austria
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E-mail: peter.schoenswetter@univie.ac.at

Abstract

There is considerable controversy concerning the fate of Alpine plants during Pleistocene glaciations. While some studies have found evidence for nunatak survival, others have explained the present genetic patterns by survival only in peripheral refugia. We investigated 75 populations of high alpine Ranunculus glacialis from its entire Alpine distribution. Phylogeographical analyses of AFLP data revealed four groups of populations. Two of them, located in the western Alps, were genetically isolated from each other and from the eastern groups, whereas the two eastern Alpine groups were genetically more similar to each other. This suggests longer isolation and/or lower levels of gene flow in the two western groups. As all groups are close to, or overlap with, presumed glacial refugia, invoking glacial survival on nunataks is unnecessary to explain the present genetic pattern. Similar to the phylogeographical patterns of R. glacialis, the previously investigated alpine Phyteuma globulariifolium and Androsace alpina, which are also confined to siliceous bedrock, showed strong geographical affinities to peripheral refugial areas and there were large-scale congruencies in the location of these refugia for all three species. © 2004 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2004, 81, 183–195.

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