Get access

Molecular taxonomy and phylogeography of Miniopterus schreibersii (Kuhl, 1817) (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae), in the Eurasian transition

Authors

  • RAŞİT BİLGİN,

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Environmental Research and Conservation, Columbia University, 1200 Amsterdam Avenue, MC 5557, New York, NY 10027,USA
    2. Department of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology, Columbia University, 1200 Amsterdam Avenue, MC 5557, New York, NY 10027,USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • AHMET KARATAŞ,

    1. Department of Biology, Niğ de University, Niğ de, TR-51100, Turkey
    Search for more papers by this author
  • EMRAH ÇORAMAN,

    1. Institute of Environmental Sciences, Bogazici University, Istanbul, 80815, Turkey
    Search for more papers by this author
  • IVAN PANDURSKI,

    1. Institute of Zoology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences 1, Tzar Osvoboditel Blvd., 1000 Sofia, Bulgaria
    Search for more papers by this author
  • ELENI PAPADATOU,

    1. The School of Biology, University of Leeds, L. C. Miall Building, Clarendon Way, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • JUAN CARLOS MORALES

    1. Center for Environmental Research and Conservation, Columbia University, 1200 Amsterdam Avenue, MC 5557, New York, NY 10027,USA
    2. Department of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology, Columbia University, 1200 Amsterdam Avenue, MC 5557, New York, NY 10027,USA
    Search for more papers by this author

E-mail: irb16@columbia.edu

Abstract

Miniopterus schreibersii is a polytypic bat species, with one of the widest distribution ranges among the mammals. We studied the genetic differentiation and taxonomy of this species in the transition zone between south-eastern Europe and Anatolia (in Asia), where two subspecies have been described. The results indicated a sharp genetic break between the samples from western Anatolia and south-eastern Europe and those of eastern Anatolia. In addition, the samples from western Anatolia and south-eastern Europe were seen to be reciprocally monophyletic, although the differentiation was less drastic. These patterns of genetic differentiation suggest the presence of two distinct groups within the M. schreibersii complex in the region, concordant with previous subspecific recognition. The cause of this genetic break is most likely differentiation in separate glacial refugia followed by secondary contact. However, more samples are needed to assess whether these represent different species, as well as to understand more clearly the causes of this differentiation. © 2006 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2006, 87, 577–582.

Ancillary