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Molecular phylogeny of the genus Tibicina (Hemiptera, Cicadidae): rapid radiation and acoustic behaviour

Authors

  • JÉRÔME SUEUR,

    Corresponding author
    1. NAMC-CNRS UMR 8620, Bât. 446, Université Paris XI, F-91405 Orsay, Cedex, France
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  • DAN VANDERPOOL,

    1. Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, 75 North Eagleville Road, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3043, USA
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  • CHRIS SIMON,

    1. Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, 75 North Eagleville Road, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3043, USA
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  • DAVID OUVRARD,

    1. Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Département Systématique et Evolution, USM 601 MNHN and UMR 5202 CNRS, Case Postale 50/Entomologie, 45, Rue Buffon, F-75005 Paris, France
    2. Naturhistorisches Museum Basel, Augustinergasse 2, CH-4001 Basel, Switzerland
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  • THIERRY BOURGOIN

    1. Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Département Systématique et Evolution, USM 601 MNHN and UMR 5202 CNRS, Case Postale 50/Entomologie, 45, Rue Buffon, F-75005 Paris, France
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Current address: Institut de Recherche sur la Biologie de l’Insecte, UMR CNRS 6035, Université de Tours, 37200 Tours, France. E-mail: jerome.sueur@univ-tours.fr

Abstract

To estimate the potential contribution of ethological and ecological parameters to the mechanisms of species formation and species isolation in the Palearctic cicada genus Tibicina, we constructed a molecular phylogenetic hypothesis of extant Tibicina species. Seven mitochondrial genes and a fragment of a nuclear gene were sequenced (3046 bp). Mitochondrial genes included 547 informative sites but the nuclear gene was too conserved to be included in the analysis. The tree was characterized by a basal polytomy indicating that Tibicina species arose rapidly. Such rapid radiation might explain the low divergence in the acoustic communication observed between species. Parameters describing habitat selection and acoustic communication were mapped onto the tree. A shift in habitat selection accompanied by acoustic changes might have contributed to one speciation event. The stochastic distribution of the same acoustic characters on the other branches of the tree implies, however, that the subtle acoustic differences between species could be the result of previous speciation events and independent evolutionary histories, rather than having contributed themselves in the speciation and isolation processes. © 2007 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2007, 91, 611–626.

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