SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

‘… In calling up images of the past, I find that the plains of Patagonia frequently cross before my eyes; yet these plains are pronounced by all wretched and useless. They can be described only by negative characters; without habitations, without water, without trees, without mountains, they support only a few dwarf plants. Why then, and the case is not peculiar to myself, have these arid wastes taken so firm a hold on my memory? …’ (Charles Darwin (1839) Journal of Researches into the Natural History and Geology of the Countries Visited during the Voyage of the HMS Beagle)

Patagonia played a central role in the development of Charles Darwin's thinking and career and the year 2009 marked the 150th anniversary of the publication of his ‘Origin’ book. A symposium in 2009 entitled ‘Palaeogeography and Palaeoclimatology of Patagonia: Effects on Biodiversity’ thus appeared to be a fitting way to celebrate this landmark event at the Museo de Ciencias Naturales of the Universidad Nacional de La Plata, in La Plata, Argentina. The symposium was organized to provide the forum and opportunities for the exchange of information and gathering of existing knowledge on the changes in climate, geography and landscape Patagonia experienced through the ages. Such an exchange of information can best be achieved by inviting an eclectic mix of natural scientists with a common interest in Patagonia to share their knowledge over a period of a number of days. Symposium participants thus included scientists from fields as diverse as palaeoclimatology, earth sciences, palaeontology, molecular evolutionary biology, and phylogeography. Earth scientists included those interested in processes operating over timescales of millions to hundreds of millions of years (e.g. tectonics, marine transgressions) to those interested in processes operating over timescales of thousands to hundreds of thousands of years (e.g. Quaternary glacial cycles and accompanying changes in landscape and sea level). The common denominator for all participants was, however, a focal interest in Patagonia. This special issue of the Biological Journal of the Linnean Society is the result of such initiative.

‘Land of contradictions! To this day I do not know whether I love it with all my soul or hate it with all my heart. Or both.’ (George Gaylord Simpson (1934) Attending Marvels)

The issue begins with a review of our knowledge on the atmospheric circulation over Patagonia from the Jurassic to the present based on proxy data and climate modelling scenarios (Compagnucci, 2011). We are informed that, despite changes in its relative position since the beginning of the breakup of Pangaea in the Early Jurassic approximately 200 Mya, Patagonia has always been situated within a latitudinal band affected by the Westerlies. The effect the Westerlies had on climate, however, changed with the final uplift of the southern Patagonian Andes during the Neogene (Ramos & Ghiglione, 2008). During this time, the Andes began acting as a barrier to wind circulation causing one of the most drastic rain shadows on Earth, leading to pronounced precipitation gradients from west to east, and also leading to increased desertification east of the Andes. During the Quaternary, there were also marked differences in atmospheric circulation patterns between glacial and interglacial periods, with the Westerlies likely shifting towards the Equator during the Last Glacial Maximum, although some palaeoclimate modelling scenarios support the hypothesis of a general decrease in surface windspeed instead of a latitudinal shift. Both scenarios, a latitudinal shift towards the Equator of the Westerlies' southern boundary, as well as a general decrease in surface windspeed, would produce similar effects on climate (Compagnucci, 2011). Regardless of the actual behaviour of the Westerlies during the Glacial periods of the Quaternary, both Ponce et al. (2011) and Cavallotto, Violante & Hernández Molina (2011) tell us that, at least during the LGM, the climate of Patagonia would have been vastly more continental than it is today. Climate became more continental as a consequence of the almost doubling of the surface area of Patagonia, which resulted from the dramatic sea level drop that accompanied the global accumulation of ice.

The period covered by the Symposium covers the formation of the Andean Cordillera and Folguera et al. (2011) review and synthesize the literature on this process. A review of the evolution of major palaeogeographical features in Patagonia is provided, particularly the impact of plate tectonics on the older, more stable areas such as the cratonic massifs, and the surrounding marine basins since the Late Cretaceous, with the subsequent build up of the Patagonian Andean ranges. They also relate the evolution of volcanism on the continent to the behaviour of the subducting Pacific tectonic plates at the mountains and beyond them, onto the lowlands. The cyclic shallow subduction is then inferred to be responsible for major palaeoenvironmental changes throughout the entire Patagonian region (Folguera et al., 2011).

That the climate in Patagonia during the glacial periods of the Quaternary would have been tundra-like (i.e. cold and dry) does not mean there was no water over Patagonia. Indeed, Martínez & Kutschker (2011) tell us the situation was very likely quite the opposite, at least during the full glacial periods (when glaciers were fully formed and stable), each lasting thousands or tens of thousands of years, and perhaps also during the relatively short glacial termination periods (when glaciers underwent melting during the transition from glacial to interglacial times). At these times, very large and powerful rivers crossed the Patagonian steppe with water discharges in some cases presumed to have been up to ten times higher than at present. These powerful rivers carried ice melt water and pebbles, and are thus presumed to be responsible for the abundance, widespread distribution and degree of sphericity of the ‘Rodados Patagónicos’ or the ‘Patagonian Shingle formation’ (Martínez & Kutschker, 2011), as first named and described by Charles Darwin:

‘These white beds are everywhere capped by a mass of gravel, forming probably one of the largest beds of shingle in the world … When we consider that all these pebbles, countless as the grain of sand in the desert, have been derived from the slow falling of masses of rock on the old coast-lines and banks of rivers, and that these fragments have been dashed into smaller pieces, and that each of them has since been slowly rolled, rounded, and far transported, the mind is stupefied in thinking over the long, absolutely necessary, lapse of years. Yet this gravel has been transported, and probably rounded, subsequently to the deposition of the white beds, and long subsequently to the underlying beds with the tertiary shells …’ (Charles Darwin (1839) Journal of Researches into the Natural History and Geology of the Countries Visited during the Voyage of the HMS Beagle.)

The biological implications of these large and powerful rivers crossing the Patagonian steppe are multiple. Under the assumption that they did not freeze over completely during the winters of the glacial periods, these rivers are likely to have formed impassable barriers to north–south migration and dispersal by terrestrial fauna (Martínez & Kutschker, 2011). For aquatic fauna, they likely had the opposite effect. Their braided and deltaic morphology and interconnections once they reached the easternmost areas of the exposed continental shelf at times of low sea level would have facilitated the latitudinal dispersal of genetic variants (Ponce et al., 2011) as has been inferred to have been the case for Percicthys trucha (Ruzzante et al., 2011).

We also learned that there were times when the area of Patagonia was much smaller than what it is today. Malumián & Náñez (2011) provide a synthesis of five marine transgressions that covered Patagonia to various extents and for differing lengths of time, generally coeval with climatic optima. The first transgression discussed, and one of the most extensive transgressions Patagonia experienced, took place during the Maastrichtian–Danian (approximately 65 Mya) and the last transgression took place during the Middle Miocene (approximately 11–15 Mya). This last transgression was, however, more pervasive into central and northern Argentina than in Patagonia, where it was of minor extent (Malumián & Náñez, 2011). A common feature to all of these transgressions is that a shallow and extended sea covered Patagonia carrying foraminiferal assemblages of peculiar palaeoecological and biogeographical features (Malumián & Náñez, 2011). According to the presented information, it should be noted here that, perhaps, certain parts of Patagonia have always been above sea level and have been exposed to atmospheric agents starting in the Late Jurassic or even before then.

Two other papers in the first section give us an synthetic view of the palaeogeographic changes that took place in Patagonia from the Late Cretaceous to the Pliocene (Nullo & Combina, 2011) and from the Late Cretaceous to the Miocene (Aragón et al., 2011) and the consequences that these changes had on biodiversity. Palaeogeographic and palaeoclimatic changes are described based on stratigraphic and sedimentological records, on knowledge of the number and extension of marine transgressions as a result of sea level changes, as well as of volcanic processes (Nullo & Combina, 2011).

The Late Cenozoic glaciations are described by Rabassa, Coronato & Martínez (2011), who have identified the presence of glaciers at the Andean ranges since the Late Miocene, which expanded eastwards onto the piedmont areas at least 15 times during the last million years, and even reached the present submarine shelf several times in southern Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego. The Fuegian archipelago was probably totally ice-covered sometime in the Early Pleistocene, and Nothofagus forest refugia may have existed in the presently submerged continental shelf, north of Isla de los Estados. The impact of Patagonian glaciations was felt not only in Patagonia, where tundra conditions were found at least south of 44°S, but also in the Pampas, which were repeatedly occupied by Patagonian fauna and flora during glacial episodes.

PALYNOLOGY AND PALAEONTOLOGY

  1. Top of page
  2. PALYNOLOGY AND PALAEONTOLOGY
  3. PHYLOGEOGRAPHY
  4. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
  5. PALAEOGEOGRAFÍA Y PALAEOCLIMATOLOGÍA EN PATAGONIA: EFECTOS SOBRE LA BIODIVERSIDAD
  6. PALINOLOGÍA Y PALAEONTOLOGÍA
  7. FILOGEOGRAFÍA
  8. AGRADECIMIENTOS
  9. REFERENCES

The second section in the issue comprises six papers dealing with palynological and palaeontological evidence and the implications for palaeoclimate. In the section's first contribution, Quattrocchio et al. (2011) describe the compositional changes of palynologic assemblages in Patagonia from Mesozoic to Cenozoic times. In keeping with the broad objectives of the symposium, the authors relate these changes in the palynobiota to the climatic history of the region starting from the times Patagonia was part of the supercontinent Pangaea, 250 Mya ago, to the elevation of the Andean Cordillera during the Cenozoic and culminating with a description of changes in the distribution of the vegetation and the climatic implications during the Quaternary (Quattrocchio et al., 2011). While this study discusses what inferences on past climate can been made from the abundance and distribution of pollen over a period of 250 Myr, the following study by Cusminsky et al. (2011) focuses in the Late Quaternary and on how similarities and differences between extant and fossil lacustrine ostracod assemblages can be used to infer characteristics of the palaeoclimate. With this goal in mind, Cusminsky et al. (2011) examine the environmental conditions that characterize the extant ostracod assemblages from two distant lakes in Patagonia, Lake Carilaufquen in northern, and Lake Cardiel in southern Patagonia. They then examine fossil ostracod assemblages from the two lakes and use the previous information to infer the prevailing environmental conditions at the time of the deposition of these fossil assemblages (Cusminsky et al., (2011). The next paper, by Iglesias, Artabe & Morel (2011), takes an approach similar to that by Quattrocchio et al. (2011) but, instead of focusing on pollen, it focuses on past floristic assemblages from the Mesozoic, Palaeogene and Neogene plant records and relates them to palaeoclimate and climate forcing elements such as continental drift including the beginning of the breakup of Pangaea in the Early Jurassic, the opening of the Drake Passage in the Miocene, as well as the uplift of the Andean Cordillera in the Middle Miocene (Iglesias et al., 2011).

‘… Those miserable flocks of sheep and that trickle of petroleum have no real significance. If they were to cease completely, the rest of the world would hardly know it, and human thought and progress would not falter in their stride. Patagonia's wealth of fossils is its real and essential contribution to the world. The fossils add chapters to human knowledge which are preserved nowhere else. And such knowledge has no ill application but only enrich experience and give background and substance for intellectual advance. In the last analysis, most of what we are that beasts are not is due to this impractical but orderly curiosity which is called pure science.’ (George Gaylord Simpson (1934) Attending Marvels)

The next three papers describe vertebrate palaeontological evidence on fishes and penguins (Cione et al., 2011), squamatan reptiles (Albino, 2011), and terrestrial birds (Tambussi, 2011). All three papers focus on what the respective fossil assemblages can tell us about palaeoclimate: Cione et al. (2011) analyze three rich marine fossil assemblages that were formed during two marine transgressions that flooded Patagonia in the Early and Middle to Late Miocene (Malumián & Náñez, 2011). Cione et al. (2011) note the absence in the fossil record of a Miocene temperate fossil assemblage similar to that of the extant Magellanic fauna of the south-west Atlantic Ocean and infer from this absence that the cold temperate fauna of that time likely exhibited a more southern distribution than at present (Cione et al., 2011). Albino (2011) infers changes in palaeoclimate from the distinct temporal trajectories in diversity and distribution among ‘lizards’, amphisbaenians and snakes revealed by their fossil record from the Late Cretaceous to the Quaternary. Interestingly, although the diversity and distribution of tupinamine teeids and boid snakes as well as that of ‘colubrids’ declined, that of pleurodontid iguanians increased following the geographical fragmentation and the emergence of drier environments in Patagonia generated by the Andean uplift and other changes in the Miocene. Finally, Tambussi (2011) focuses on four bird associations, three from the Miocene and one from the Pliocene, as we know by now, a period of important changes in Patagonia resulting from the expansion of the steppe across extra Andean Patagonia following the major uplift of the Andean Cordillera.

PHYLOGEOGRAPHY

  1. Top of page
  2. PALYNOLOGY AND PALAEONTOLOGY
  3. PHYLOGEOGRAPHY
  4. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
  5. PALAEOGEOGRAFÍA Y PALAEOCLIMATOLOGÍA EN PATAGONIA: EFECTOS SOBRE LA BIODIVERSIDAD
  6. PALINOLOGÍA Y PALAEONTOLOGÍA
  7. FILOGEOGRAFÍA
  8. AGRADECIMIENTOS
  9. REFERENCES

The last section deals with phylogeographic patterns for extant species. The section starts with a review of phylogeographic studies on Patagonian terrestrial flora and fauna, with a focus within the latter, on rodents and lizards (Sèrsic et al., 2011). Phylogeographic patterns are compared among groups and inferences are made concerning the locations of five putative glacial refugia. Similarly, phylogeographic breaks and consistencies and inconsistencies across groups are identified, and potential colonization routes are inferred (Sèrsic et al., 2011). The second paper in this section synthesizes our current understanding of the Late Neogene diversification and extant diversity among Sigmodontine rodents (Pardiñas et al., 2011), and the last paper in the special issue compares molecular neutral genetic divergence and adaptive phenotypic divergence in response to environmental variation in a widespread Patagonian fish, Percichthys trucha (Ruzzante et al., 2011). This study thus examines the interplay between the effects that Quaternary glaciations had on neutral genetic variation and those that natural selection imposes on phenotypic variation in extant populations.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

  1. Top of page
  2. PALYNOLOGY AND PALAEONTOLOGY
  3. PHYLOGEOGRAPHY
  4. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
  5. PALAEOGEOGRAFÍA Y PALAEOCLIMATOLOGÍA EN PATAGONIA: EFECTOS SOBRE LA BIODIVERSIDAD
  6. PALINOLOGÍA Y PALAEONTOLOGÍA
  7. FILOGEOGRAFÍA
  8. AGRADECIMIENTOS
  9. REFERENCES

The initial seed for this Symposium was planted during a Catalysis meeting in 2008 at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCENT) in North Carolina entitled: ‘Perspectives on the Origin and Conservation of Biodiversity in Patagonia’ during which it became clear that a synthesis of available palaeoclimatological, geological, and palaeontological information on Patagonia was needed that would be relevant for an improved understanding and interpretation of phylogeographic data. The result was the present Symposium entitled: ‘Palaeogeography and Palaeoclimatology of Patagonia: Effects on Biodiversity’. Funding for its organization was provided by an award from the Gerencia de Desarrollo Científico y Tecnológico (Dirección de Proyectos y Becas) of CONICET (Argentina) to Jorge Rabassa and Eduardo P. Tonni, by an NSF-PIRE award (OISE 0530267) for support of collaborative research on Patagonian Biodiversity granted to the following institutions (listed alphabetically): Brigham Young University (USA), Centro Nacional Patagónico (ARG), Dalhousie University (CAN), Instituto Botánico Darwinion (ARG), Universidad Austral de Chile, Universidad Nacional del Comahue (ARG), Universidad de Concepción (CH), and University of Nebraska (USA) and by an NSERC Discovery award to D.E.R. The Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Museo of the Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina) provided the location for the Symposium. The editors of this special issue, Daniel Ruzzante and Jorge Rabassa would like to thank Symposium Co-Organizers Professors Eduardo P. Tonni and Alfredo Carlini for their efforts and, as local organizers, for their disproportionate responsibility in making this symposium the success that it was. We would also like thank Professor John Allen, Editor of the Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, for his enthusiasm, support and encouragement, as well Ms Sal Moore (Wiley) for her guidance and generous assistance throughout the editorial process.

PALAEOGEOGRAFÍA Y PALAEOCLIMATOLOGÍA EN PATAGONIA: EFECTOS SOBRE LA BIODIVERSIDAD

  1. Top of page
  2. PALYNOLOGY AND PALAEONTOLOGY
  3. PHYLOGEOGRAPHY
  4. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
  5. PALAEOGEOGRAFÍA Y PALAEOCLIMATOLOGÍA EN PATAGONIA: EFECTOS SOBRE LA BIODIVERSIDAD
  6. PALINOLOGÍA Y PALAEONTOLOGÍA
  7. FILOGEOGRAFÍA
  8. AGRADECIMIENTOS
  9. REFERENCES

… In calling up images of the past, I find that the plains of Patagonia frequently cross before my eyes; yet these plains are pronounced by all wretched and useless. They can be described only by negative characters; without habitations, without water, without trees, without mountains, they support only a few dwarf plants. Why then, and the case is not peculiar to myself, have these arid wastes taken so firm a hold on my memory? … [Charles Darwin (1839) Journal of Researches into the Natural History and Geology of the Countries Visited during the Voyage of the HMS Beagle]

Patagonia jugó un papel central en el desarrollo del pensamiento y la carrera académica de Charles Darwin (el naturalista Don Carlos, como lo llamaban sus contemporáneos de las Pampas y Patagonia), y en el año 2009 se cumplieron 150 años de la publicación de su libro ‘El Origen de las Especies’. Organizar un simposio titulado ‘Palaeogeografía y Palaeoclimatología de Patagonia: Efectos sobre la Biodiversidad’, justamente en el año 2009, fue entonces sin duda una forma de rendir homenaje a su nombre y conmemorar, en el Museo de Ciencias Naturales de la Universidad Nacional de La Plata, en la ciudad de La Plata, Argentina, este evento transcendental. Este simposio fue organizado para facilitar el intercambio de información y la recopilación del conocimiento existente sobre las variaciones climáticas y los cambios en la geografía, el paisaje y los climas experimentados por Patagonia a través del tiempo. Una de las mejores formas de lograr ese intercambio de información fue invitar a compartir unos días a una mezcla ecléctica de especialistas en ciencias naturales que tuvieran como denominador común el interés científico en Patagonia. El simposio incluyó a especialistas en palaeoclimatología, ciencias de la Tierra, palaeontología, biología molecular evolutiva y filogeografía. Entre los especialistas en ciencias de la Tierra se contaron científicos interesados en aquellos procesos que operan en escalas de tiempo de millones a cientos de millones de años (p.ej., procesos tectónicos, transgresiones marinas) e investigadores interesados en procesos actuantes en escalas temporales de miles a cientos de miles de años (p.ej., los ciclos glaciales del Cuaternario y los correspondientes cambios en el paisaje y el nivel del mar). Este número especial del Biological Journal of the Linnean Society es el resultado de esa iniciativa.

‘Land of contradictions! To this day I do not know whether I love it with all my soul or hate it with all my heart. Or both.’ (George Gaylord Simpson (1934) Attending Marvels)

El volumen comienza con una revisión y síntesis de nuestro conocimiento acerca de la circulación atmosférica sobre Patagonia desde el Jurásico hasta el presente, basado en datos proxy y en los escenarios descriptos por diversos modelos climáticos (Compagnucci, 2011). Este estudio nos informa que, a pesar de los cambios en la posición geográfica (latitud) de la Patagonia desde el comienzo de la fragmentación de Pangaea en el Jurásico Temprano (approximately 200 Mya), esta región ha estado siempre situada dentro de la banda latitudinal afectada por los ‘Westerlies’. El efecto que los ‘Westerlies’ han tenido sobre el clima, sin embargo, cambió con el levantamiento de los Andes Patagónicos durante el Neógeno (Ramos & Ghiglione, 2008). A partir de esta época los Andes comenzaron a actuar como una eficiente barrera para la circulación del viento, causando uno de los más dramáticos y pronunciados gradientes de humedad sobre el Globo y resultando en una progresiva desertificación del territorio desde la Cordillera hacia el este. Durante el Cuaternario hubo además cambios en los patrones de circulación atmosférica entre los períodos glaciales e interglaciales: los Westerlies probablemente se desplazaron hacia latitudes menores, es decir hacia el Ecuador, durante el Último Máximo Glacial (UMG), aunque algunos modelos palaeoclimáticos apoyan la hipótesis de una disminución general en la intensidad del viento superficial en lugar de un desplazamiento latitudinal. De cualquier manera es probable que ambos escenarios tuvieran el mismo efecto sobre el clima (véase Compagnucci, 2011).

Independientemente del comportamiento de los Westerlies, tanto Ponce et al. (2011) como Cavallotto et al. (2011) nos cuentan que, al menos durante el UMG, el clima de la Patagonia haya probablemente sido mucho más continental que en el presente. Esto se debe a que la Patagonia habría tenido en ese momento el doble de la superficie actual debido al descenso del nivel del mar que acompañó a la acumulación de hielo a nivel global (Cavallotto et al., 2011; Ponce et al., 2011).

El período cubierto por el simposio incluye el proceso de formación de la Cordillera de los Andes y Folguera et al. (2011) sintetizan la literatura disponible sobre este proceso. Esos autores describen la evolución de las características palaeogeográficas más importantes de la Patagonia, poniendo énfasis en el impacto de la tectónica de placas sobre las áreas más antiguas y estables, como los macizos cratónicos y las cuencas marinas circundantes desde el Cretácico tardío con el subsecuente levantamiento de los Andes Patagónicos. Folguera et al. (2011) relacionan también la evolución del volcanismo sobre el continente con el comportamiento de la subducción correspondiente en las placas tectónicas pacíficas. Los autores infieren que esta subducción cíclica y poco profunda es responsable de los mayores cambios palaeoambientales en toda la región patagónica (Folguera et al. 2011).

Que el clima en la Patagonia durante los períodos glaciales del Cuaternario haya tenido características de tundra (frío y seco) no significa que no haya habido agua en la región. Martínez & Kutschker (2011) nos informan que la situación era probablemente todo lo contrario, al menos durante los períodos pleniglaciales (cuando los glaciares estaban totalmente formados y estables), cada uno de los cuales duró desde miles a decenas de miles de años, y tal vez también durante los períodos relativamente cortos de terminación glacial (cuando los glaciares comienzan a derretirse durante la transición de un período glacial a uno interglacial). Estos períodos muy probablemente estuvieron caracterizados por anchos y poderosos ríos que cruzaron la Patagonia con caudales de hasta 10 veces mayores que en el presente. Estos ríos, acarreando agua de deshielo y rocas serían los responsables de la alta abundancia, amplia distribución y alto grado de esfericidad de los ‘Rodados Patagónicos’, los cuales fueron denominados y descritos por primera vez por Charles Darwin como ‘the Patagonian Shingle Formation’:

‘These white beds are everywhere capped by a mass of gravel, forming probably one of the largest beds of shingle in the world … When we consider that all these pebbles, countless as the grain of sand in the desert, have been derived from the slow falling of masses of rock on the old coast-lines and banks of rivers, and that these fragments have been dashed into smaller pieces, and that each of them has since been slowly rolled, rounded, and far transported, the mind is stupefied in thinking over the long, absolutely necessary, lapse of years. Yet this gravel has been transported, and probably rounded, subsequently to the deposition of the white beds, and long subsequently to the underlying beds with the tertiary shells …’ (Charles Darwin (1839) Journal of Researches into the Natural History and Geology of the Countries Visited during the Voyage of the HMS Beagle.)

Las implicancias biológicas de estos grandes y poderosos ríos son claramente múltiples. Bajo la presunción de que ellos no se hubieran congelado completamente durante los inviernos de los períodos glaciales, es probable que hayan constituido barreras impasables para la migración y dispersión en sentido norte-sur de las faunas terrestres (Martínez & Kutschker, 2011). Para la fauna acuática, en cambio, probablemente hayan tenido el efecto opuesto. La morfología entrelazada y deltaica mostrada por estos ríos una vez que alcanzaron la plataforma continental, y dado que ésta permanecía expuesta durante los períodos glaciales debido a la reducción en el nivel del mar, facilitó la dispersión latitudinal de variantes genéticas (Ponce et al., 2011) como se ha inferido en el caso de la perca criolla, Percichthys trucha, de amplia distribución en Patagonia andina y extra-andina (Ruzzante et al., 2011).

También hubo períodos durante los cuales Patagonia tuvo una menor extensión que en el presente. Malumián & Náñez (2011) sintetizan la información disponible sobre cinco transgresiones marinas de distinta magnitud que ocuparon la Patagonia por períodos de duración diversa pero que fueron en general contemporáneas con períodos de óptimos climáticos. La primera transgresión a la que hacen mención estos autores y una de las de mayor extensión, ocurrió durante el Maastrichtiano–Daniano (65 Mya), mientras que la última tuvo lugar durante el Mioceno medio (approximately 11–15 Mya). Esta última transgresión, sin embargo, fue más importante en el norte y centro de Argentina que en Patagonia, donde tuvo una extensión menor (Malumián & Náñez, 2011). Durante cada una de estas transgresiones hubo partes de Patagonia que quedaron sumergidas en un mar poco profundo. Estos mares dejaron como testigo asociaciones de foraminíferos de características palaeoecológicas y biogeográficas peculiares (Malumián & Náñez, 2011). Es importante también recalcar que, de acuerdo a la información existente, hay ciertas partes de Patagonia que han permanecido desde el Jurásico tardío e incluso tal vez desde antes, por encima del nivel del mar y por ende, expuestas a agentes atmosféricos desde entonces.

Los dos trabajos restantes en esta primera sección nos dan una visión sintética de los cambios palaeogeográficos en Patagonia desde el Cretácico tardío hasta el Plioceno (Nullo & Combina, 2011) y desde el Cretácico tardío hasta el Mioceno (Aragón et al., 2011). Ambos trabajos infieren las consecuencias de estos cambios sobre la biodiversidad. Nullo & Combina (2011) describen cambios palaeoclimáticos y palaeogeográficos sobre la base de información obtenida de registros estratigráficos y sedimentológicos, de información concerniente al número y extensión de las transgresiones marinas y de información sobre procesos volcánicos (Nullo & Combina, 2011).

Rabassa et al. (2011) describen las glaciaciones del Cenozoico tardío identificando la presencia de glaciares en la zona andina desde el Mioceno tardío. La evidencia sugiere que los glaciares se han extendido hacia las áreas del piedemonte ubicadas al este de los Andes, por lo menos 15 veces durante el último millón de años, en varias ocasiones alcanzando incluso la plataforma continental actual en Patagonia austral y Tierra del Fuego. Es probable que el Archipiélago Fueguino haya estado totalmente cubierto por el hielo durante el Pleistoceno temprano y que refugios de bosques de Nothofagus hayan existido en la plataforma continental actual al norte de la Isla de los Estados. El impacto de las glaciaciones patagónicas no fue sentido sólo en Patagonia, donde prevalecieron las condiciones de tundra al sur de 44°S, sino también en la región pampeana, que fue repetidamente ocupada por la flora y fauna patagónicas durante los períodos glaciales.

PALINOLOGÍA Y PALAEONTOLOGÍA

  1. Top of page
  2. PALYNOLOGY AND PALAEONTOLOGY
  3. PHYLOGEOGRAPHY
  4. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
  5. PALAEOGEOGRAFÍA Y PALAEOCLIMATOLOGÍA EN PATAGONIA: EFECTOS SOBRE LA BIODIVERSIDAD
  6. PALINOLOGÍA Y PALAEONTOLOGÍA
  7. FILOGEOGRAFÍA
  8. AGRADECIMIENTOS
  9. REFERENCES

La segunda sección en este número especial contiene seis trabajos sobre palinología y palaeontología. El común denominador de todos éstos son las inferencias que proporcionan acerca del palaeoclima. En el primer trabajo, Quattrocchio et al. (2011) describen los cambios composicionales en las asociaciones de polen en la Patagonia desde el Mesozoico al Cenozoico. Los autores relacionan estos cambios en la palinobiota con la historia climática de la región, comenzando cuando Patagonia formaba parte del supercontinente Pangaea, hace 250 Mya, luego pasando por el Cenozoico durante el período de elevación de los Andes y culminando con el Cuaternario (Quattrocchio et al., 2011). Mientras este estudio describe las inferencias que se pueden hacer sobre el clima en base a la composición, abundancia y distribución del polen durante un período de 250 Myr, el siguiente trabajo, por Cusminsky et al. (2011), se enfoca en el Cuaternario tardío y en las similitudes y diferencias entre asociaciones actuales y fósiles de ostrácodos en dos lagos patagónicos distantes, el lago Carilaufquen en el norte y el lago Cardiel en el sur de la Patagonia. Los autores infieren las condiciones ambientales dominantes en cada lugar en el momento de depositación de las asociaciones fósiles sobre la base de los ambientes relacionados con las asociaciones actuales (Cusminsky et al., 2011). El siguiente trabajo, por Iglesias et al. (2011), toma un enfoque similar al de Quattrocchio et al. (2011) pero en lugar de basarse en polen, describe asociaciones florísticas e incluye asociaciones del Mesozoico, Paleógeno y Neógeno. Iglesias et al. (2011) infieren el palaeoclima de estos períodos integrando esta información florística con elementos que se conoce influyeron sobre el clima, tales como la deriva continental y la fragmentación de Pangaea en el Jurásico temprano, la apertura del Pasaje Drake en el Mioceno y la elevación de la Cordillera de los Andes en el Mioceno medio.

… Those miserable flocks of sheep and that trickle of petroleum have no real significance. If they were to cease completely, the rest of the world would hardly know it, and human thought and progress would not falter in their stride. Patagonia's wealth of fossils is its real and essential contribution to the world. The fossils add chapters to human knowledge which are preserved nowhere else. And such knowledge has no ill application but only enrich experience and give background and substance for intellectual advance. In the last analysis, most of what we are that beasts are not is due to this impractical but orderly curiosity which is called pure science. [George Gaylord Simpson (1934) Attending Marvels]

Los próximos tres trabajos describen la evidencia palaeontológica disponible sobre peces y pinguinos (Cione et al., 2011), reptiles esquamatos (Albino, 2011) y aves terrestres (Tambussi, 2011). Los tres trabajos tienen como objetivo discutir qué información proporcionan las asociaciones fósiles sobre el palaeoclima. Cione et al. (2011) analizan tres ricas asociaciones de fósiles marinos depositados durante las dos transgresiones marinas del Mioceno Temprano y del Mioceno medio-tardío, respectivamente (véase Malumián & Náñez, 2011). Cione et al. (2011) notan la ausencia de asociaciones fósiles del Mioceno temprano similares a la fauna magallánica actual del Atlántico Sud-Occidental e infieren, sobre la base de esta ausencia, que la fauna templada-fría de aquellos tiempos tal vez exhibiera una distribución más austral que en el presente (Cione et al., 2011). Albino (2011) interpreta cambios en el palaeoclima sobre la base de diferencias en las trayectorias temporales de diversidad y distribución entre diversos tipos de lagartijas, amphisbaenos y serpientes fósiles desde el Cretácico tardío al Cuaternario. Mientras que la diversidad y distribución de teeidos tupinaminos, de serpientes boideos y de colúbridos declinó, la de los iguánidos pleurodóntidos aumentó a partir de la fragmentación geográfica y la aparición de ambientes más secos generados por el levantamiento de los Andes y otros cambios ambientales del Mioceno. Finalmente, Tambussi (2011) describe cuatro asociaciones de aves, tres del Mioceno y una del Plioceno, períodos que, como ya sabemos a esta altura, fueron de cambios climáticos muy importantes en Patagonia y que resultaron en la expansión de la estepa luego del levantamiento principal de la Cordillera de los Andes.

FILOGEOGRAFÍA

  1. Top of page
  2. PALYNOLOGY AND PALAEONTOLOGY
  3. PHYLOGEOGRAPHY
  4. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
  5. PALAEOGEOGRAFÍA Y PALAEOCLIMATOLOGÍA EN PATAGONIA: EFECTOS SOBRE LA BIODIVERSIDAD
  6. PALINOLOGÍA Y PALAEONTOLOGÍA
  7. FILOGEOGRAFÍA
  8. AGRADECIMIENTOS
  9. REFERENCES

La última sección describe patrones filogeográficos de grupos existentes. La sección comienza con una revisión de la literatura sobre patrones filogeográficos en la flora y fauna terrestres de Patagonia, con énfasis, en lo que concierne a la fauna, sobre reodores y lagartijas (Sèrsic et al., 2011). El estudio compara patrones filogeográficos entre grupos y sobre esta base identifica e infiere la posición geográfica de cinco refugios glaciarios. Similarmente, identifica quiebres filogeográficos y consistencias e inconsistencias entre grupos e infiere posibles rutas de colonización (Sèrsic et al., 2011). El segundo trabajo en esta sección sintetiza nuestro conocimiento sobre los procesos de diversificación del Neógeno y sobre la diversidad existente en roedores sigmodontinos (Pardiñas et al., 2011), mientras que el último trabajo compara diversidad genética molecular neutral con divergencia fenotípica adaptativa en respuesta a variaciones ambientales en la perca criolla, Percichthys trucha, un pez de aguas continentales de amplia distribución en la Patagonia andina y extra-andina (Ruzzante et al., 2011). En síntesis, este estudio examina la interacción entre los efectos que las glaciaciones del Cuaternario han tenido sobre la variación genética neutral y aquellos que la selección natural impone sobre la variación fenotípica en poblaciones actuales.

AGRADECIMIENTOS

  1. Top of page
  2. PALYNOLOGY AND PALAEONTOLOGY
  3. PHYLOGEOGRAPHY
  4. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
  5. PALAEOGEOGRAFÍA Y PALAEOCLIMATOLOGÍA EN PATAGONIA: EFECTOS SOBRE LA BIODIVERSIDAD
  6. PALINOLOGÍA Y PALAEONTOLOGÍA
  7. FILOGEOGRAFÍA
  8. AGRADECIMIENTOS
  9. REFERENCES

La semilla inicial para la génesis de este simposio fue plantada durante un ‘Catalysis meeting’ en el National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCENT) en Carolina del Norte, Estados Unidos, en 2008, reunión que fue titulada como ‘Perspectives on the Origin and Conservation of Biodiversity in Patagonia’. Durante la misma, fue evidenciado que para entender e interpretar mejor los patrones filogeográficos emergentes en sistemas patagónicos bajo estudio, era necesaria una síntesis de la información existente sobre la palaeoclimatología, la geología, y la palaeontología de Patagonia. El resultado fue este simposio, titulado ‘Palaeogeografía y Palaeoclimatología de la Patagonia: sus efectos sobre la biodiversidad’. Fondos para su organización provinieron de un subsidio de la Gerencia de Desarrollo Científico y Tecnológico (Dirección de Proyectos y Becas) del CONICET (Argentina) otorgado a Jorge Rabassa y Eduardo P. Tonni, de un subsidio de NSF-PIRE (USA, OISE 0530267) para el apoyo de investigaciones colaborativas sobre Biodiversidad en Patagonia otorgado a las siguientes instituciones, enumeradas aquí en orden alfabético, Brigham Young University (USA), Centro Nacional Patagónico (ARG), Dalhousie University (CAN), Instituto Botánico Darwinion (ARG), Universidad Austral de Chile, Universidad Nacional del Comahue (ARG), Universidad de Concepción (CH), y University of Nebraska (USA) y de un subsidio de NSERC (Canadá) otorgado a Daniel Ruzzante. La Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Museo de la Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina) facilitó generosamente el espacio donde se realizó el Simposio. Los editores de este número especial, Daniel Ruzzante y Jorge Rabassa agradecen profundamente a los dos co-organizadores del Simposio, profesores Eduardo P. Tonni y Alfredo Carlini por sus esfuerzos y, debido a su calidad de organizadores locales, por su insoslayable responsabilidad en lograr que este simposio tuviera el éxito que tuvo. Queremos también agradecer al Profesor John Allen, editor del Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, por su entusiasmo y apoyo, y a Sal Moore (Wiley) por su guía y generosa asistencia durante el proceso editorial.

REFERENCES

  1. Top of page
  2. PALYNOLOGY AND PALAEONTOLOGY
  3. PHYLOGEOGRAPHY
  4. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
  5. PALAEOGEOGRAFÍA Y PALAEOCLIMATOLOGÍA EN PATAGONIA: EFECTOS SOBRE LA BIODIVERSIDAD
  6. PALINOLOGÍA Y PALAEONTOLOGÍA
  7. FILOGEOGRAFÍA
  8. AGRADECIMIENTOS
  9. REFERENCES
  • Albino AM. 2011. Evolution of squamata reptiles in Patagonia based on the fossil record. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 103: 441457.
  • Aragón E, Goin FJ, Aguilera YE, Woodburne MO, Carlini AA, Roggiero MF. 2011. Paleogeography and paleoenvironments of northern Patagoniafrom the Late Cretaceous to the Miocene: the Paleogene Andean gap and the rise of the Northern Patagonian High Plateau. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 103: 305315.
  • Cavallotto JL, Violante R, Hernández Molina FJ. 2011. Geological aspects and evolution of the patagonian continental margin. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 103: 346362.
  • Cione AL, Cozzuol MA, Dozo MT, Acosta Hospitaleche C. 2011. Marine vertebrate assemblages in the southwest Atlantic during the Miocene. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 103: 423440.
  • Compagnucci RH. 2011. Atmospheric circulation over Patagonia since the Jurassic to present: a review through proxy data and climatic modeling scenarios. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 103: 229249.
  • Cusminsky G, Schwalb A, Pérez AP, Pineda D, Viehberg F, Whatley R, Markgraf V, Gilli A, Ariztegui D, Anselmetti FS. 2011. Late Quaternary environmental changes in Patagonia as inferred from lacustrine fossil and extant ostracods. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 103: 397408.
  • Folguera A, Orts D, Spagnuolo M, Rojas Vera E, Litvak V, Sagripanti L, Ramos ME, Ramos VA. 2011. A review of Late Cretaceous to Quaternary paleogeography of the Southern Andes. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 103: 250268.
  • Iglesias A, Artabe AE, Morel EM. 2011. The evolution of Patagonian climate and vegetation, from the Mesozoic to the present. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 103: 409422.
  • Malumián N, Náñez C. 2011. The Late Cretaceous–Cenozoic transgressions in Patagonia and the Fuegian Andes: foraminifera, paleoecology and paleogeography. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 103: 269288.
  • Martínez OA, Kutschker A. 2011. The ‘Rodados Patagónicos’ (Patagonian shingle formation) of Eastern Patagonia: environmental conditions of gravel sedimentation. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 103: 336345.
  • Nullo F, Combina A. 2011. Paleogeography and continental deposits of Patagonia, from the Late Cretaceous to the Pliocene. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 103: 289304.
  • Pardiñas UFJ, Teta P, D'Elía G, Lessa EP. 2011. The evolutionary history of Sigmodontine Rodents in Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 103: 495513.
  • Ponce JF, Rabassa J, Coronato A, Borromei AM. 2011. Paleogeographic evolution of the Atlantic coast of Pampa and Patagonia since the Last Glacial Maximum to the Middle Holocene. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 103: 363379.
  • Quattrocchio ME, Volkheimer W, Borromei AM, Martínez MA. 2011. Changes of the palynobiotas in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic of Patagonia: a review. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 103: 380396.
  • Rabassa J, Coronato A, Martínez O. 2011. Late Cenozoic glaciations in Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego: an updated review. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 103: 316335.
  • Ramos VA, Ghiglione J. 2008. Tectonic evolution of the Patagonian Andes. In: RabassaJ, ed. The late Cenozoic of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego. Oxford: Elsevier, 5771.
  • Ruzzante DE, Walde SJ, Macchi PJ, Alonso M, Barriga JP. 2011. Phylogeography and phenotypic diversification in the Patagonian fish Percichthys trucha: the roles of Quaternary glacial cycles and natural selection. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 103: 221228.
  • Sèrsic AN, Cosacov A, Cocucci AA, Johnson LA, Pozner R, Avila LJ, Sites JW, Morando M. 2011. Emerging phylogeographic patterns of plants and terrestrial vertebrates from Patagonia. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 103: 475494.
  • Tambussi CP. 2011. Paleoenvironmental and faunal inferences based upon the avian fossil record of Patagonia and Pampa: what works and what does not. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 103: 458474.