Molecular phylogenetics of Uvaria (Annonaceae): relationships with Balonga, Dasoclema and Australian species of Melodorum

Authors

  • LINLIN ZHOU,

    1. Division of Ecology & Biodiversity, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, China
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  • YVONNE C. F. SU,

    1. Division of Ecology & Biodiversity, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, China
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  • PIYA CHALERMGLIN,

    1. Agricultural Technology Department, Thailand Institute of Scientific & Technological Research, 35 Technopolis, Liap Khlong Ha Road, Khlong Luang District, Pathum Thani Province 12120, Thailand
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  • RICHARD M. K. SAUNDERS

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Ecology & Biodiversity, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, China
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E-mail: saunders@hkucc.hku.hk

Abstract

An extended molecular phylogenetic analysis of Uvaria (Annonaceae) is presented, using maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods, based on sequences of four plastid DNA regions (matK, psbA-trnH spacer, rbcL and trnL-F). The additional taxa include the monotypic West African genus Balonga, the monotypic South-East Asian genus Dasoclema and seven Australian representatives of the genus Melodorum. The results indicate that all of these taxa are nested within a well-supported clade otherwise consisting of Uvaria species, indicating that their taxonomic treatment needs to be reassessed. The distinguishing morphological characteristics of the taxa are re-evaluated and interpreted as specialized adaptations of the basic Uvaria structure. The genus Uvaria is accordingly extended following the transfer of these species, necessitating six new nomenclatural combinations and two replacement names. © 2010 The Linnean Society of London, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 2010, 163, 33–43.

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