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Arctic char, Salvelinus alpinus (L.), captured during the summer, 1972, in Cumberland Sound, Baffin Island, fed mainly on planktonic amphipods (Parathemisto libellula, Pseudalibrotus glacialis), copepods (Calanus hyperboreus), and fish (Boreogadus saida, Myoxocephalus sp.), but failed to utilize coelenterates, planktonic gastropods, and epi- and infauna. The considerable variation in the species composition of the diet of char of different lengths was due primarily to size selection. The average length of all individuals in stomach contents and of representatives of most food species increased with the length of fish. The minimum and maximum length of frequently ingested organisms increased four and 90 times, respectively, as char increased from 4 to 85 cm. Char less than 10 cm in length captured in rivers tributary to the Sound fed mainly on larval Chironomidae (Eukiefferiella bavaria) during the summer, whereas those longer than 10 cm fed predominantly on other char. During the winter the stomachs of the smaller individuals were always empty while the diet of the large char was restricted to other fish. Most species available to the char were consumed in proportion to their relative abundance in the rivers. The dry weight of stomach contents, when expressed on a unit weight basis, decreased with the wet weight of char in both fresh and salt water. Thus, fish 10 g in weight contained approximately 1.5 times more food in their stomachs than those weighing 1000 g. The stomach contents of char captured in salt water weighed approximately 11 times more than those of char of comparable size captured simultaneously in fresh water. The fish fed at random intervals during the day and ceased feeding at night. Arctic char, at all sampling areas, had reached a length of approximately 9.6 cm after four years. Upon migrating to salt water, their growth rate increased sharply with the result that after eight years they were 26.5 cm in length, reflecting food availability. The growth rate gradually decreased in fish older than nine years so that 20 year olds were approximately 70.0 cm in length.