Biology of a seahorse species, Hippocampus comes in the central Philippines

Authors

  • N. C. Perante,

    1. Project Seahorse—Haribon Foundation for the Conservation of Natural Resources, 12 Espina Compound, B Rodriguez, Cebú City 6000, Philippines
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  • M. G. Pajaro,

    1. Project Seahorse—Haribon Foundation for the Conservation of Natural Resources, 12 Espina Compound, B Rodriguez, Cebú City 6000, Philippines
    2. Project Seahorse—Department of Biology, McGill University, 1205 Ave. Dr. Penfield, Montréal, Québec, H3A 1B1, Canada
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  • J. J. Meeuwig,

    1. Project Seahorse—Department of Biology, McGill University, 1205 Ave. Dr. Penfield, Montréal, Québec, H3A 1B1, Canada
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  • A. C. J. Vincent

    Corresponding author
    1. Project Seahorse—Department of Biology, McGill University, 1205 Ave. Dr. Penfield, Montréal, Québec, H3A 1B1, Canada
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†Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. Tel.: +1514398 5112; fax: +1514398 2408; email: amanda_vincent@maclan.mcgill.ca

Abstract

Based on 16 months of field observations on tagged seahorses Hippocampus comes in the Philippines, adults were found to be nocturnal, to maintain small home ranges, and to live mostly among corals. Prolonged pair associations suggested that H. comes, like many other seahorse species, were probably monogamous, a conclusion consistent with their low density and sparse distribution. Site and mate fidelity suggest that H. comes populations may fare poorly under current high levels of exploitation.

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