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Male size predicts the ability to defend offspring in the biparental convict cichlid Archocentrus nigrofasciatus

Authors

  • J. L. Gagliardi-Seeley,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biological Sciences, Lehigh University, 111 Research Drive, Bethlehem, PA 18015, U.S.A.
      *Tel.: +1 610 758 4523; fax: +1 610 758 4004; email: jeg8@lehigh.edu
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  • M. Itzkowitz

    1. Department of Biological Sciences, Lehigh University, 111 Research Drive, Bethlehem, PA 18015, U.S.A.
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*Tel.: +1 610 758 4523; fax: +1 610 758 4004; email: jeg8@lehigh.edu

Abstract

The data from this field study provided evidence that biparental convict cichlid Archocentrus nigrofasciatus pairs with large males had fewer intruders near their offspring compared to pairs with small males. This suggested that large males were more capable of defending their young against predators.

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