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Sneaky egg-eating in Telmatherina sarasinorum, an endemic fish from Sulawesi

Authors

  • S. M. Gray,

    Corresponding author
    1. * Behavioural Ecology Research Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6 Canada, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin–Whitewater, Whitewater, WI 53190, U.S.A., and § Department of Agriculture, Tadulako University, Palu, Indonesia
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  • J. S. McKinnon,

    1. * Behavioural Ecology Research Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6 Canada, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin–Whitewater, Whitewater, WI 53190, U.S.A., and § Department of Agriculture, Tadulako University, Palu, Indonesia
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  • F. Y. Tantu,

    1. * Behavioural Ecology Research Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6 Canada, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin–Whitewater, Whitewater, WI 53190, U.S.A., and § Department of Agriculture, Tadulako University, Palu, Indonesia
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  • L. M. Dill

    1. * Behavioural Ecology Research Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6 Canada, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin–Whitewater, Whitewater, WI 53190, U.S.A., and § Department of Agriculture, Tadulako University, Palu, Indonesia
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†Author to whom correspondence should be addressed at present address: Department of Biology, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 Canada. Tel.: +1 613 533 6000 ext. 78738; fax: +1 613 533 6617; email: suzanne.gray@queensu.ca

Abstract

Observations of a novel behavioural tactic employed by egg-eating male Telmatherina sarasinorum are described. Four T. sarasinorum males were observed actively courting females of closely related Telmatherina antoniae, enticing the female to spawn, and then eating the eggs. The possible evolutionary implications of sneaky egg-eating behaviour are discussed.

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