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Scalloped hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini, utilizes deep-water, hypoxic zone in the Gulf of California

Authors

  • S. J. Jorgensen,

    Corresponding author
    1. * Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, U.S.A. and Centro de Investigaciones del Noroeste, Apartado Postal 128, La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico
      †Hopkins Marine Station of Stanford University, 120 Oceanview Blvd., Pacific Grove, CA 93950, U.S.A. Tel.: +1 831 655 6237; fax: +1 831 375 0793; email: salvo@stanford.edu
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  • A. P. Klimley,

    1. * Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, U.S.A. and Centro de Investigaciones del Noroeste, Apartado Postal 128, La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico
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  • A. F. Muhlia-Melo

    1. * Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, U.S.A. and Centro de Investigaciones del Noroeste, Apartado Postal 128, La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico
    Search for more papers by this author

†Hopkins Marine Station of Stanford University, 120 Oceanview Blvd., Pacific Grove, CA 93950, U.S.A. Tel.: +1 831 655 6237; fax: +1 831 375 0793; email: salvo@stanford.edu

Abstract

A hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini tracked for 74 days revealed an expansion of the range of vertical distribution for the species to include the extreme hypoxic environment of the oxygen minimum layer in the Gulf of California.

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