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Hypoxia and male behaviour in an African cichlid Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor victoriae

Authors

  • K. M. Gotanda,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biology, McGill University, 1205 Docteur Penfield Avenue, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 1B1 Canada
    2. Redpath Museum, McGill University, 859 Sherbrooke West, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2K6 Canada
      Tel.: +514 398 4086 ext. 09058; email: kiyoko.gotanda@mail.mcgill.ca
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  • E. E. Reardon,

    1. Department of Biology, McGill University, 1205 Docteur Penfield Avenue, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 1B1 Canada
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    • Present address: Biosciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hatherly Laboratories, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4PS, U.K.

  • L. J. Chapman

    1. Department of Biology, McGill University, 1205 Docteur Penfield Avenue, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 1B1 Canada
    2. Wildlife Conservation Society, 2300 Southern Boulevard, Bronx, NY 10460, U.S.A.
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Tel.: +514 398 4086 ext. 09058; email: kiyoko.gotanda@mail.mcgill.ca

Abstract

This study tested the prediction that hypoxia may reduce the frequency of energetically expensive behaviours by quantifying male mating and aggressive displays in the cichlid Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor victoriae after long-term acclimation (5 months) to either high dissolved oxygen (DO) or low DO. Regardless of DO treatment, males engaged in more aggressive displays than mating displays; however, males acclimated to low DO reduced their total number of displays compared to high DO-acclimated males.

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