Surgical wound healing in radio-tagged adult Pacific lamprey Entosphenus tridentatus held on different substrata

Authors

  • M. G. Mesa,

    Corresponding author
    1. U. S. Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Centre, Columbia River Research Laboratory, 5501 Cook-Underwood Road, Cook, WA 98605, U.S.A.
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  • R. J. Magie,

    1. U. S. Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Centre, Columbia River Research Laboratory, 5501 Cook-Underwood Road, Cook, WA 98605, U.S.A.
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    • Present address: Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, NOAA-Point Adams Research Station, 520 Heceta Place, Hammond, OR 97121, U.S.A.

  • E. S. Copeland,

    1. U. S. Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Centre, Columbia River Research Laboratory, 5501 Cook-Underwood Road, Cook, WA 98605, U.S.A.
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  • H. E. Christiansen

    1. U. S. Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Centre, Columbia River Research Laboratory, 5501 Cook-Underwood Road, Cook, WA 98605, U.S.A.
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Tel.: +1 509 538 2299 ext. 246; email: mmesa@usgs.gov

Abstract

Radio-tagged adult Pacific lamprey Entosphenus tridentatus held in a raceway with Plexiglas-lined walls and bottom healed more slowly and retained sutures longer than fish held in an all-concrete raceway or one with Plexiglas walls and a cobble-lined bottom. On all substrata, healing depended on when sutures were lost, and fish that lost their sutures in <14 days post-surgery healed faster than those that kept sutures longer. Long-term suture retention led to tissue trauma, infection and poor survival.

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