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Micro-computed tomography: an alternative method for shark ageing

Authors

  • P. T. Geraghty,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
    2. NSW Department of Primary Industries, Cronulla Fisheries Research Centre of Excellence, P. O. Box 21, Cronulla, NSW 2230, Australia
      Tel.: +61 2 9850 8234, +61 2 9527 8411; email: pascal.geraghty@industry.nsw.gov.au
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  • A. S. Jones,

    1. Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
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  • J. Stewart,

    1. NSW Department of Primary Industries, Cronulla Fisheries Research Centre of Excellence, P. O. Box 21, Cronulla, NSW 2230, Australia
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  • W. G. Macbeth

    1. NSW Department of Primary Industries, Cronulla Fisheries Research Centre of Excellence, P. O. Box 21, Cronulla, NSW 2230, Australia
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Tel.: +61 2 9850 8234, +61 2 9527 8411; email: pascal.geraghty@industry.nsw.gov.au

Abstract

Micro-computed tomography (microCT) produced 3D reconstructions of shark Carcharhinus brevipinna vertebrae that could be virtually sectioned along any desired plane, and upon which growth bands were readily visible. When compared to manual sectioning, it proved to be a valid and repeatable means of ageing and offers several distinct advantages over other ageing methods.

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