On the Birth and Upbringing of the Female Chimpanzee “Jacqueline” (born 28/11/37 in the Zoological Gardens, London).

Authors

  • Arthur Budd,

    1. observations made by them in conjunction with First-Class Keeper F. W. Shelley, together with an Appendix showing some developmental comparisons of four Chimpanzees born in the Zoological Gardens from 1935 to 19372
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  • L. G. Smith

    1. observations made by them in conjunction with First-Class Keeper F. W. Shelley, together with an Appendix showing some developmental comparisons of four Chimpanzees born in the Zoological Gardens from 1935 to 19372
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  • 2

    Communicated by G. M. VEVBBS, M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P., F.Z.S., Superintendent.

SUMMARY.

.In summarising these short surveys, we find the progress of “Jubilee” was assured by the keepers' disciplinary powers over the mother in enforcing her to nurse the baby, plus their additional individual help to the infant. Without this, “Jubilee's” satisfactory development would have been very doubtful.

Careful nursing of “June,” owing to her weakness at birth, was of vital importance. “Sally,” in addition to being a good mother, allowed her keepers to attend her baby, and in consequence of this co-operation, “June's” development was very progressive. The very cold spell which intervened was responsible for the decline in the mother's health and the cause of the infant developing broncho-pneumonia. The refusal of “Sally” to allow us to nurse her young one during her illness finally decided her baby's death. The good development of “June,” aided by the co-operative nursing, and her death caused by the cold and lack of nursing, further demonstrated the necessity for human aid.

“Jacqueline,” the third of our captive-born Chimpanzees, developed with artificial feeding, under conditions of a modern nursery. Through this individual attention and treatment given to the infant, her rate of progress was in advance, and her final physical condition was better than any of the other apes born in the gardens.

Slow and very poor physical development was the result of “Sally” nursing her second infant “Noel.” This seems to prove conclusively that the chances of successfully rearing young captive-born Chimpanzees depends on the sociability and understanding between the mothers and their keepers. It also suggests the similarity to human nursing and the beneficial results of the modern nutritional and anti-deficiency disease diets.

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