Systematic revision of Hoggicosa Roewer, 1960, the Australian ‘bicolor’ group of wolf spiders (Araneae: Lycosidae)

Authors

  • PETER R. LANGLANDS,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Animal Biology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, 6009, Australia
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  • VOLKER W. FRAMENAU

    1. School of Animal Biology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, 6009, Australia
    2. Department of Terrestrial Zoology, Western Australian Museum, Locked bag 49, Welshpool DC, WA, 6986, Australia
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*E-mail: peter.langlands@grs.uwa.edu.au

Abstract

The Australian wolf spider genus Hoggicosa Roewer, 1960 with the type species Hoggicosa errans (Hogg, 1905) is revised to include ten species: Hoggicosa alfi sp. nov.; Hoggicosa castanea (Hogg, 1905) comb. nov. (= Lycosa errans Hogg, 1905 syn. nov.; = Lycosa perinflata Pulleine, 1922 syn. nov.; = Lycosa skeeti Pulleine, 1922 syn. nov.); Hoggicosa bicolor (McKay, 1973) comb. nov.; Hoggicosa brennani sp. nov.; Hoggicosa duracki (McKay, 1975) comb. nov.; Hoggicosa forresti (McKay, 1973) comb. nov.; Hoggicosa natashae sp. nov.; Hoggicosa snelli (McKay, 1975) comb. nov.; Hoggicosa storri (McKay, 1973) comb. nov.; and Hoggicosa wolodymyri sp. nov. The Namibian Hoggicosa exigua Roewer, 1960 is transferred to Hogna, Hogna exigua (Roewer, 1960)comb. nov. A phylogenetic analysis including nine Hoggicosa species, 11 lycosine species from Australia and four from overseas, with Arctosa cinerea Fabricius, 1777 as outgroup, supported the monophyly of Hoggicosa, with a larger distance between the epigynum anterior pockets compared to the width of the posterior transverse part. The analysis found that an unusual sexual dimorphism for wolf spiders (females more colourful than males), evident in four species of Hoggicosa, has evolved multiple times. Hoggicosa are burrowing lycosids, several constructing doors from sand or debris, and are predominantly found in semi-arid to arid regions of Australia.

© 2010 The Linnean Society of London, Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2010, 158, 83–123.

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