Passive-Oxidation Kinetics of High-Purity Silicon Carbide from 800° to 1100°C

Authors

  • C. Eric Ramberg,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
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    • Member, American Ceramic Society.

    • *

      Now at the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.

  • Gary Cruciani,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
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  • Karl E. Spear,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
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    • Member, American Ceramic Society.

  • Richard E. Tressler,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
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    • Member, American Ceramic Society.

  • Charles F. Ramberg Jr.

    1. Center for Animal Health and Productivity, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania 19348
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  • N. S. Jacobson—contributing editor

  • Presented at the 95th Annual Meeting of the American Ceramic Society, April 19, 1993, Cincinnati, OH (Paper No. SX-22-93).

  • Based in part on the thesis submitted by C. E. Ramberg for the M.S. Degree in Ceramic Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, December 1992.

Abstract

Highly textured chemically vapor-deposited silicon carbide (CVD-SiC) thick films were oxidized and compared to single-crystal SiC and single-crystal silicon. The oxidation rates of the (111) face of the cubic CVD-SiC were the same as those of the (0001) face of the single-crystal SiC. Similarly, the opposite faces of the two materials, (inline image) and (000inline image), also oxidized at nominally the same rates. The (inline image) and (000inline image) faces oxidized much faster than their opposite (lll)/(0001) faces. Ellipsometry measurements and kinetic results implied that differences existed between the oxides that grew on the opposite faces. A regression method was developed to analyze the oxide thickness versus time versus temperature behavior of the specimens simultaneously. This technique was compared to typical methods for analyzing temperature-dependent processes and estimated temperature- dependent parameters (e.g., activation energy) and their errors more accurately.

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