Mechanical and Biological Performance of Calcium Phosphate Coatings on Porous Bone Scaffold

Authors

  • Hae-Won Kim,

    Corresponding author
    1. Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Eastman Dental Institute, University College London, London WC1X 8LD, U.K.
    2. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742, Korea
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    • Member, American Ceramic Society.

    • University College London.

    • §

      Seoul National University.

  • Jonathan C. Knowles,

    1. Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Eastman Dental Institute, University College London, London WC1X 8LD, U.K.
    2. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742, Korea
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    • University College London.

  • Hyoun-Ee Kim

    1. Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Eastman Dental Institute, University College London, London WC1X 8LD, U.K.
    2. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742, Korea
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    • Member, American Ceramic Society.

    • §

      Seoul National University.


  • G. S. Fischman—contributing editor

  • This work was supported financially by a Royal Society Fellowship for H.-W.K.

Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. e-mail: hwkim@snu.ac.kr.

Abstract

Composite coatings, consisting of calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics and phosphate-based glass (P-glass), were obtained on a strong ZrO2 porous scaffold to improve biocompatibility by combining mechanical properties and biological activity. Powder mixtures of hydroxyapatite (HA) and P-glass in varying composition and content were dip-coated on a ZrO2 porous scaffold and heat-treated above 800°C for 2 h in air. During thermal treatment, substantial reaction and crystallization occurred, resulting in coating phases of HA, tricalcium phosphate (TCP), dicalcium phosphate (DCP), and surrounding glass. The CaP-glass coating layer was highly dense and uniform and adhered firmly to the ZrO2 scaffold. The adhesion strength of the coating layer as tested on a nonporous disk increased with increasing glass addition and decreasing CaO content in glass. The highest strength was about 40 MPa, an improvement of twice as high as that of pure HA coating. The osteoblastic cells grew and spread actively through the coated scaffolds. The differentiation of cells on the CaP coatings was much higher than that on ZrO2 substrate and comparable to or slightly higher than that on pure HA coating.

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