Retracted: Meta-analysis on the comparison between two topical calcineurin inhibitors in atopic dermatitis

Authors

Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Retraction Volume 40, Issue 5, 418, Article first published online: 14 May 2013

  • Funding sources: none.

  • Conflicts of interest: none.

  • Author contributions: Z. Q. Y. and W. M. Z. contributed equally to this work. All the above-mentioned authors have participated sufficiently to take public responsibility for the work.

Dan Luo, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Dermatology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210029, China. Email: daniluo2005@sina.com

Abstract

Topical calcineurin inhibitors have proved to be suitable for the treatment of AD. We conducted a meta-analysis comparing efficacy and tolerance of tacrolimus with pimecrolimus in treatment of AD. According to our meta-analysis, tacrolimus 0.1% was more effective than pimecrolimus 1% in adult patients (week 3: risk ratio [RR] 0.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.42–0.73), and tacrolimus (a combination of 0.03% and 0.1%) was also more effective than pimecrolimus 1% in pediatric patients (week 6/end of study: RR 0.76, 95% CI 0.63–0.92). Regardless of age or illness severity, tacrolimus 0.1% had higher efficacy than pimecrolimus 1% in the treatment of AD (week 3: RR 0.55, 95% CI 0.42–0.72). In adult patients, tacrolimus 0.1% had more adverse events than pimecrolimus 1% (RR 1.30, 95% CI 1.02–1.66), but the incidence of adverse events between tacrolimus 0.1% (or 0.03%) and pimecrolimus 1% was not significantly different in pediatric patients. No matter whether the patients were adult or pediatric, more pimecrolimus-treated patients withdrew from the trials because of a lack of efficacy. Regardless of age and illness severity, more pimecrolimus 1%-treated patients withdrew from the trials because of a lack of efficacy, compared with tacrolimus 0.1% (or 0.03%)-treated patients. More pimecrolimus-treated pediatric patients withdrew from the trials because of adverse events (RR 0.26, 95% CI 0.1–0.68). More pimecrolimus 1%-treated patients withdrew from the trials because of adverse events, compared with tacrolimus 0.03%-treated patients, regardless of age (RR 0.1, 95% CI 0.02–0.53). In conclusion, tacrolimus ointment has higher efficacy and better tolerance than pimecrolimus cream in treatment of AD.

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