• Open Access

Generation of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine from DNA using rat liver homogenates

Authors

  • Minyi Shi,

    1. Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544
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  • Haruko Takeshita,

    1. Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544
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  • Masaharu Komatsu,

    1. Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544
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  • Baohui Xu,

    1. Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544
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  • Kohji Aoyama,

    1. Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544
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  • Toru Takeuchi

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544
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To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: takeuchi@m.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp

Abstract

In relation to carcinogenesis, aging and other pathologic conditions, urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8OHdG) is widely used as a marker for evaluating the effect of oxidative stress on DNA. Because no reports have described how 8OHdG is generated from DNA in vivo or by biological materials, and how it is excreted into urine, the authors investigated the generation of 8OHdG from DNA, using rat liver homogenate. Oxidatively damaged DNA samples containing different levels of 8OHdG were prepared using ultraviolet irradiation with three different concentrations of riboflavin. Following incubation of damaged DNA samples with rat liver homogenates, the generation of 8OHdG from the DNA was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection after ultrafiltration of the incubation mixtures. The generation of 8OHdG was also tested with an anti-8OHdG antibody. The quantity of 8OHdG generated from the DNA by rat liver homogenates was dependent on the 8OHdG levels in the DNA: almost all 8OHdG in the DNA was released as 8OHdG by rat liver homogenates. Generation of 8OHdG correlated with the degradation of DNA. Interestingly, the generated 8OHdG was stable in the presence of rat liver homogenates, whereas deoxyguanosine (dG) rapidly disappeared in the same conditions. Less than 1/10 000 of dG was converted to 8OHdG when dG was incubated with rat liver homogenate. Incubation of 8-hydroxyguanine with rat liver homogenates did not generate 8OHdG. These findings suggest that most of the 8OHdG in DNA is released as 8OHdG during DNA degradation and that, because of its stability, 8OHdG is excreted into urine, thus providing a convenient measure of oxidative damage to DNA. (Cancer Sci 2005; 96: 13–19)

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