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Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Materials and Methods
  4. Results
  5. Discussion
  6. Acknowledgments
  7. References

Soluble forms of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-related chain A and B (MICA/B) are increased in the sera of patients with malignancy and impair the antitumor immune response by downregulating expression of their cognate immunoreceptor natural killer group 2, member D (NKG2D). Recently, soluble MICA/B were reported to appear even in some premalignant diseases, raising questions about the impact of soluble MICA/B produced from tumors on the expression of NKG2D. The present study examined soluble MICA/B in chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and their involvement in the immune-cell expression of NKG2D during transcatheter arterial embolization for HCC. The levels of soluble MICA/B were significantly higher in chronic liver disease and HCC patients than in healthy volunteers. The progression of liver disease and that of the tumor were independent determinants for soluble MICA/B levels. Immunohistochemistry revealed that MICA/B were expressed not only in HCC tissue but also on hepatocytes in cirrhotic livers. The transcatheter arterial embolization therapy significantly decreased serum levels of soluble MICA, but not soluble MICB, and increased the NKG2D expression on natural killer cells and CD8-positive T cells; there was an inverse correlation between changes in soluble MICA levels and in NKG2D expression. In conclusion, although soluble MICA/B are produced from both HCC and premalignant cirrhotic livers, therapeutic intervention for HCC can reduce the levels of soluble MICA and thereby upregulate the expression of NKG2D. Cancer therapy may have a beneficial effect on NKG2D-mediated antitumor immunity. (Cancer Sci 2008; 99: 1643–1649)

Abbreviations:
APC

allophycocyanin

ELISA

enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

FITC

fluorescein isothiocyanate

HCC

hepatocellular carcinoma

MFI

mean fluorescence intensity

MICA/B

major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-related chain A and B

NK

natural killer

NKG2D

natural killer group 2, member D

PBMC

peripheral blood mononuclear cell

PE

phycoerythrin

TAE

transcatheter arterial embolization

TNM

tumor node metastasis

MHC class I-related chain A and B, glycoproteins expressed on the cellular membrane, are ligands for NKG2D expressed on a variety of immune cells.(1) In contrast to classical MHC class I molecules, MICA/B are expressed rarely on normal cells but frequently on tumor cells, including colon cancer, prostate cancer, HCC, and brain tumors.(2–5) The engagement of MICA/B and NKG2D strongly activates NK cells and costimulates T cells, enhancing their cytolytic ability and cytokine production.(6) Thus, the MICA/B–NKG2D pathway is an important mechanism by which the host immune system recognizes and kills transformed cells.(7) In addition to those membrane-bound forms, MICA/B are also cleaved proteolytically from tumor cells and appear as soluble forms in sera of patients with malignancy.(8–10) The levels of NKG2D expression tend to be decreased in patients with high levels of soluble MICA/B.(4) In addition, sera from those patients can downregulate NKG2D expression in vitro.(5,11) These data suggest that soluble MICA/B in the circulation downregulate NKG2D expression and disturb NKG2D-mediated antitumor immunity, raising the possibility that cancer therapy might reduce the serum levels of soluble MICA/B and thereby improve the NKG2D-related immune environment. However, this possibility has not been addressed directly by examining soluble MICA/B and NKG2D expression in a cohort of patients before and after cancer therapy. Furthermore, recent reports by Holdenrieder et al. demonstrating that soluble MICA/B are increased not only in malignant disease but also in some benign diseases, such as of the gastrointestinal tract, gynecologic organs, and lungs, raise questions about the impact of cancer therapy on modulating soluble MICA/B levels.(12,13)

Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Chronic liver disease caused by hepatitis virus infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis leads to a predisposition for HCC; liver cirrhosis, in particular, is considered to be a premalignant condition.(14,15) With regard to treatment, surgical resection or percutaneous techniques such as ethanol injection and radiofrequency ablation are considered to be choices for curable treatment of localized HCC, whereas TAE is a well-established technique for unresectable HCC.(16) We reported previously that soluble MICA could be detected in sera of HCC patients.(17) However, the clinical significance of the soluble forms of NKG2D ligands in liver disease has not yet been established in a comprehensive manner, because the previous study was conducted on a small number of patients, did not include patients with premalignant conditions such as liver cirrhosis, and did not analyze its closely related molecule MICB. Furthermore, influences of therapeutic intervention on soluble NKG2D ligands in patients have been unclear. In the present study, we examined soluble MICA and soluble MICB in sera from a large number of patients with chronic liver diseases and HCC and their impact on NKG2D expression on immune cells during TAE therapy for HCC.

Materials and Methods

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Materials and Methods
  4. Results
  5. Discussion
  6. Acknowledgments
  7. References

Stock sera from patients with chronic liver disease and HCC.  We used frozen stock sera obtained from consecutive patients with chronic liver disease who had been registered at our institute from February 2002 to April 2006. They included 141 patients with chronic hepatitis, 104 patients with liver cirrhosis, and 232 patients with HCC. The differential diagnosis between chronic hepatitis and liver cirrhosis was basically from liver biopsy (n = 98), but for those who had not undergone biopsy the diagnosis was based on clinical findings from the aspartate aminotransferase/platelet ratio index (APRI) score.(18) Diagnosis of HCC was based on unequivocal clinical and imaging data. The control group consisted of 104 healthy volunteers of an age range similar to the liver cirrhosis group. Table 1 summarizes the control and patient characteristics of age, sex, etiology of liver disease, Child–Pugh classification, and TNM staging of HCC. Child–Pugh classification is a well-established index for progression of liver disease in cirrhotic patients where A, B, and C indicate compensated cirrhosis, mildly decompensated cirrhosis, and severely decompensated cirrhosis, respectively. The TNM staging adopted in the present study was that modified by the Liver Cancer Study Group of Japan.(16)

Table 1. Control and patient characteristics
CharacteristicHealthy controlChronic hepatitisLiver cirrhosisHCC
  • AIH, autoimmune hepatitis; HBV, hepatitis B virus; HCC, hepatocellular carcinoma; HCV, hepatitis C virus; NASH, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis; PBC, primary biliary cirrhosis; TNM, tumor node metastasis.

  • *

    P < 0.05 vs control, hepatitis, and cirrhosis by χ2-test;

  • **

    P < 0.05 vs control, cirrhosis, and HCC by ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni test;

  • ***

    P < 0.05 vs control, hepatitis, and cirrhosis by ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni test;

  • ****

    P < 0.05 vs cirrhosis by χ2-test.

Number104141104232
Sex (male/female)49/5578/6360/44177/55*
Age (years)62 ± 1555 ± 13**61 ± 1268 ± 9***
Etiology
 HBV/HCV27/10712/7837/187
 Alcohol/NASH 0/5/2/1/4/0/
 AIH/PBC/others 2/0/01/6/40/0/3
Child–Pugh (A/B/C)34/27/26131/84/17****
TNM stage (I/II/III/IV)59/68/64/39

Detection of soluble MICA/B by ELISA.  Serum levels of soluble MICA and soluble MICB were determined differentially by commercially available ELISA kits (R & D Systems, Minneapolis, MN, USA). In preliminary experiments, we determined the median intra-assay variation (n = 5) to be between 3.5 and 5.6% for soluble MICA and between 2.4 and 7.8% for soluble MICB, and the median interassay variation (n = 5) to be between 12.8 and 18.9% for soluble MICA and between 15.2 and 18.7% for soluble MICB.

Detection of MICA/B on liver tissues by immunohistochemistry.  The human liver tissues examined were one normal liver, three from those at fibrosis stages 1 and 2 of chronic hepatitis, five from liver cirrhosis (fibrosis stage 4) patients, and five from HCC patients. Paraffin-embedded liver sections were deparafinized, heat-inactivated by a microwave oven and then subjected to immunohistochemical staining using the ABC procedure (Vector Laboratories, Burlingame, CA, USA). The primary antibody used was 6D4 monoclonal antibody, which recognizes the α1 and α2 domains of MIC molecules shared by both MICA and MICB.(2) To confirm the specificity of the staining, the 6D4 antibody was incubated with recombinant MICA (R & D Systems) for 2 h and then applied to liver sections in parallel with staining of the primary antibody as the absorption test.

Detection of membrane-bound and soluble forms of MICA/B on cultured cells.  HepG2 hepatoma cells were cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. Human non-transformed hepatocytes were purchased from Cambrex Bio Science (Charles City, IA, USA) and cultured according to the manufacturer's instructions. For detection of membrane-bound MICA/B, a single-cell suspension was stained with PE-labeled 6D4 monoclonal (R & D Systems) antibody, fixed with 2% paraformaldehyde, and then subjected to flow cytometric analysis. The culture supernatants were subjected to analysis of soluble forms of MICA and MICB using the above-mentioned ELISA assay.

Patients with HCC and TAE therapy.  Thirty-eight patients with HCC admitted to our institution for TAE therapy were enrolled prospectively in the present study. TAE was carried out by the standard procedure using an emulsion of farmorubicin and lipiodol followed by gelatin sponge particles. Blood samples were collected before and 2 weeks after TAE therapy. Twenty-one patients with HCC, matching the TAE group with respect to TNM stage and Child–Pugh score, were also enrolled as controls (Table 2). Blood samples were collected twice at a 2-week interval. Written informed consent was received from all patients and the study protocol was approved by the Ethical Committee of Clinical Research at Osaka University Hospital.

Table 2. Characteristics of hepatocellular carcinoma patients
CharacteristicTAE-treated groupNon-treated group
  1. HBV, hepatitis B virus; HCV, hepatitis C virus; TAE, transcatheter arterial embolization; TNM, tumor node metastasis.

Number3821
Sex (male/female)28/1017/4
Age (years)75 ± 1174 ± 8
Etiology (HBV/HCV)2/361/21
Child–Pugh (A/B/C)29/9/016/5/0
TNM stage (I/II/III/IV)4/20/14/02/11/8/0

Natural killer cell analysis.  PBMC were isolated from heparinized venous blood by a standard procedure. PBMC were stained with FITC-labeled anti-CD3 antibody, APC-labeled anti-CD56 antibody, and PE-labeled anti-NKG2D antibody. They were also stained with FITC-labeled anti-CD3 antibody, APC-labeled anti-CD8 antibody, and PE-labeled anti-NKG2D antibody. All antibodies were purchased from Becton Dickinson (San Jose, CA, USA). NKG2D expression on NK cells (defined as CD56-positive and CD3-negative cells) and CD8-positive T cells (defined as CD3-positive and CD8-positive cells) were analyzed by flow cytometry. As a control, corresponding fluorescence-labeled irrelevant antibodies were used. As most NK and CD8-positive T cells express NKG2D, the levels of expression were evaluated by the mean fluorescence intensity of the stained cells.

Statistics.  Values were expressed as the median and interquartile range as a box plot, and the 10th and 90th percentiles as a horizontal bar. For comparison of more than two groups, the Kruskal–Wallis rank sum test was used. If the Kruskal–Wallis test was significant, post hoc multiple comparisons were carried out using the Steel–Dwass procedure. Differences between pretreatment and post-treatment values were tested by paired t-test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

Results

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Materials and Methods
  4. Results
  5. Discussion
  6. Acknowledgments
  7. References

Soluble MICA and soluble MICB in chronic liver disease and HCC.  Soluble MICA and soluble MICB were assessed in sera from patients with chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and HCC as well as healthy volunteers. There was a stepwise increase in the levels of both soluble MICA and soluble MICB from hepatitis to HCC (Fig. 1a). Although the difference between hepatitis patients and healthy volunteers was modest, both of the levels were clearly higher in patients with liver cirrhosis and HCC than in normal volunteers or hepatitis patients. To examine whether the progression of liver disease in cirrhotic patients affects the levels of soluble MICA/B, cirrhosis patients were stratified based on Child–Pugh classification. The levels of both soluble MICA and MICB were increased significantly with the progression of liver disease (Fig. 1b).

image

Figure 1. Serum levels of soluble major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-related chain A and B (MICA/B) in chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). (a) Soluble MICA and soluble MICB levels in serum samples of healthy controls (HC), chronic hepatitis (CH), liver cirrhosis (LC), and HCC. (b) Soluble MICA and soluble MICB are associated with the progression of liver disease. Data on cirrhotic patients were stratified based on Child–Pugh classification. (c,d) Soluble MICA and soluble MICB are associated with the progression of tumors. (c) Data on cirrhosis and HCC patients were classified into three groups: patients with absence of HCC (cirrhosis), patients with low-grade HCC (tumor node metastasis [TNM] stage I and II), and patients with high-grade HCC (TNM stage III and IV). (d) To exclude the possibility of progression of liver disease being involved in increase in soluble MICA/B, soluble MICA/B levels were compared among the three groups of Child–Pugh classification A. Data are represented as box plots (median values, 10th, 25th, 75th, and 90th percentiles). The number in parentheses indicates the number of patients in each group. *P < 0.05 by Kruskal–Wallis test and post hoc Steel–Dwass test.

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Hepatocellular carcinoma often develops from cirrhotic liver and most patients with HCC included in the present study had complications from cirrhosis. To examine whether the development and progression of HCC contributes to increasing soluble MICA/B, patients with liver cirrhosis and those with HCC were classified into three groups: those with an absence of HCC, low-grade HCC (TNM stage I/II) and high-grade HCC (TNM stage III/IV). There was no significant difference in soluble MICA or soluble MICB between patients without HCC and low-grade HCC patients. However, the high-grade HCC patients showed significantly higher levels of soluble MICA or soluble MICB than patients without HCC or the low-grade HCC patients (Fig. 1c). To exclude the possibility of the progression of liver disease affecting the increases in soluble MICA/B in high-grade HCC, we selected and analyzed only the Child–Pugh A patients. In this subgroup of patients, the levels of soluble MICA/B were also significantly higher with high-grade HCC than with low-grade HCC or the absence of HCC (Fig. 1d). Thus, the progression of liver disease and that of the tumor independently affects the levels of soluble MICA or soluble MICB.

MICA/B expression in liver tissues and production of soluble MICA/B.  The increase in soluble MICA/B in cirrhotic patients suggests that MICA/B may be expressed in cirrhotic livers. We therefore examined MICA/B expression by immunohistochemistry in various human tissues including normal liver, chronic hepatitis (F1 and F2 stage), liver cirrhosis, and HCC (Fig. 2a). MICA was detected clearly in four of five HCC tissues, agreeing with a previous report.(3) Importantly, hepatocytes in four of five cirrhotic livers were positive for MICA/B, whereas MICA/B were not detected in hepatocytes from normal liver or liver at the early stage of chronic hepatitis.

image

Figure 2. Expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-related chain A and B (MICA/B) and production of their soluble forms. (a) Immunohistochemical detection of MICA/B in liver tissues. Representative staining with anti-MICA/B monoclonal antibody (6D4) is shown for normal liver, chronic hepatitis (F1 stage), liver cirrhosis (F4 stage), and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (upper panel). As a control, 6D4 monoclonal antibody was preabsorbed with recombinant MICA and applied to the neighboring corresponding sections (lower panel). (b) Flow cytometric analysis of surface expression of MICA/B on HepG2 hepatoma cells and non-transformed hepatocytes. Open and closed histograms represent the staining of anti-MICA/B antibody (6D4) and control antibody, respectively. (c) Soluble MICA and soluble MICB released from HepG2 hepatoma cells and non-transformed hepatocytes. Cells were seeded in a subconfluent condition and cultured for 48 h. The culture supernatants were applied for analysis of soluble MICA and soluble MICB by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. ND, not detected.

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We also examined the expression of MICA/B on normal hepatocytes and HepG2 hepatoma cells. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that HepG2 cells expressed MICA/B on the cell surface (Fig. 2b). Both soluble forms of MICA and MICB were detected in the supernatant of HepG2 cells cultured for 48 h (Fig. 2c). In contrast, non-transformed hepatocytes expressed MICA/B faintly and soluble MICA/B could not be detected in their culture supernatant. This observation supported the idea that both soluble MICA and soluble MICB are produced from MICA/B-expressing hepatic cells.

Downregulation of soluble MICA levels by TAE.  The above findings suggest that soluble MICA/B are produced from cirrhotic livers as well as HCC. In addition, the progression of the tumor is an important determinant of soluble MICA/B independent of the progression of liver disease. We then asked the question of whether therapeutic intervention of HCC would reduce the levels of soluble MICA or soluble MICB and affect the levels of NKG2D expression on immune cells. We prospectively analyzed the levels of soluble MICA/B and NKG2D expression in 38 HCC patients before and 2 weeks after TAE therapy. As a control, 21 HCC patients who did not receive TAE therapy but were matched to the TAE group with respect to clinical characteristics were analyzed over a 2-week interval.

In the TAE-treated group, the levels of soluble MICA were decreased significantly 2 weeks after TAE therapy compared with those before TAE (Fig. 3a). In contrast, TAE did not affect the levels of soluble MICB. Neither the levels of soluble MICA nor those of soluble MICB changed during the 2-week interval in HCC patients not receiving TAE therapy. As the progression of liver disease and that of the tumor affects the levels of soluble MICA/B, TAE-treated patients were divided according to their Child–Pugh stage or tumor stage. The levels of soluble MICA decreased significantly after TAE therapy in Child–Pugh A patients but not in Child–Pugh B and C patients (Fig. 3b). Interestingly, Child–Pugh A patients showed a significant decrease even in soluble MICB levels after TAE therapy but Child–Pugh B and C patients did not. As for tumor stage, a significant decrease in soluble MICA levels after TAE therapy was found in low-grade HCC but not in high-grade HCC (Fig. 3c). The levels of MICB did not change in the low-grade or high-grade HCC groups.

image

Figure 3. Soluble major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-related chain A and B (MICA/B) during transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) therapy. (a) Soluble MICA and soluble MICB were measured for 38 patients before and 2 weeks after TAE therapy. Twenty-one patients who did not receive TAE therapy served as controls, with soluble MICA/B being measured twice with a 2-week interval. (b) TAE-treated patients were divide into two groups: Child–Pugh A (n = 29) and Child–Pugh B and C (n = 9). (c) TAE-treated patients were divided into two groups: low-grade hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (n = 24) and high-grade HCC (n = 14). *P < 0.05 by paired t-test.

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Upregulation of NKG2D expression by TAE.  The number of PBMC as well as NK and T-cell subsets did not change over the 2-week interval in both the control and TAE-treated patients (data not shown). However, the levels of NKG2D expression on NK and CD8-positive T cells increased significantly upon TAE therapy, but not in the control group (Fig. 4a). To examine the involvement of soluble MICA in NKG2D expression, we analyzed the relationship of changes between soluble MICA and NKG2D expression in HCC patients. Change in soluble MICA was correlated inversely with changes in NKG2D expression on NK and CD8-positive T cells (Fig. 4b). There was no significant correlation between changes in soluble MICB and NKG2D expression (data not shown).

image

Figure 4. Natural killer group 2, member D (NKG2D) expression during transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) therapy. (a) NKG2D expression on natural killer (NK) cells and CD8-positive T cells. NKG2D expression on immune cells was analyzed in 38 patients before and 2 weeks after TAE therapy. Twenty-one patients who did not receive TAE therapy served as a control by measuring NKG2D expression for 2-week interval. NKG2D expression on each cell type was evaluated by mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). *P < 0.05 by paired t-test. (b) Correlation between change of soluble MICA and that of NKG2D expression on NK cells or CD8-positive T cells.

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Discussion

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Materials and Methods
  4. Results
  5. Discussion
  6. Acknowledgments
  7. References

In the present study, we demonstrated that soluble MICA/B increases with the progression of chronic liver disease as well as the progression of HCC. Increases in soluble MICA/B in advanced stages of tumors have been reported in some malignancies.(12) However, little is known about soluble MICA/B in the premalignant condition. Recently, Holdenrieder et al. examined soluble MICA/B levels in benign as well as malignant diseases from heterogeneous organs.(12,13) They found that benign diseases, such as gastrointestinal tract adenoma, pulmonary infectious disease, and gynecologic benign tumors, showed intermediate levels of soluble MICA/B between healthy controls and malignant disease. Our present findings not only agree with theirs, but also provide evidence that soluble MICA/B increases in premalignant conditions such as liver cirrhosis.

Malignant disease is known to lead frequently to the expression of MICA/B.(2) In contrast, their expression in premalignant tissues has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, MICA/B were found to be expressed in liver cirrhosis as well as HCC tissues, but not in the early stages of chronic hepatitis or in normal liver. This finding is consistent with the tendencies observed for serum-soluble MICA/B levels in chronic liver disease and HCC. Analysis of cultured cells also revealed that MICA/B expressed on hepatoma cells is released spontaneously into the culture supernatant as soluble forms, supporting the idea that MICA/B expressed in the liver may be released into the circulation. In contrast, MICA/B were not expressed on nor released from cultured non-transformed hepatocytes, which is consistent with the in vivo immunohistochemical finding. An issue to be resolved is the underlying mechanism by which non-transformed hepatocytes express and release MICA/B in pathological conditions such as liver cirrhosis. Recently, it was reported that non-transformed pulmonary epithelial cells can express MICA/B under oxidative stress-inducing conditions.(19) It was also reported that MICA/B are upregulated in non-tumor cell lines by genotoxic stress.(20) It has been speculated that oxidative and genotoxic stresses may accumulate in hepatocytes in chronic diseased liver. Thus, it is possible that those stresses may contribute to MICA/B expression in chronic diseased liver. Further study is needed to clarify this issue.

MICA/B expression in the premalignant condition raises the question of which contributes more to the production of soluble MICA/B, malignant tissues or non-malignant tissues. To address this question we analyzed the levels of soluble MICA/B in HCC patients before and after therapeutic intervention. Among treatments for HCC, TAE is a well-established technique for unresectable, advanced HCC.(16) To include HCC patients who show relatively high levels of soluble MICA/B, we chose a cohort of patients who received the TAE therapy in the present study. The data indicated that the levels of soluble MICA, but not those of soluble MICB, decreased after TAE therapy. It is not clear why soluble MICB did not change during TAE therapy. One possibility is that soluble MICB production from non-tumor livers may be relatively high compared with that of soluble MICA. In our subpopulation analysis, Child–Pugh A patients showed a significant decrease in soluble MICB levels after TAE therapy. In general, TAE therapy is more effective for Child–Pugh A patients than Child–Pugh B or C patients because the former is better able to tolerate the large dose of lipiodol emulsion and gelatin sponge that is necessary for efficient antitumor effect. Indeed, Child–Pugh A patients in our cohort showed a larger decease in α-fetoprotein levels after TAE therapy than Child–Pugh B and C patients, although the difference did not reach a significant level (our unpublished data). Thus, TAE therapy might reduce the levels of soluble MICB when it achieves substantial antitumor effect. Most importantly, the data also indicated that NKG2D expression on immune cells was clearly ameliorated with TAE therapy. Furthermore, there was an inverse correlation between a reduction in soluble MICA and upregulation of NKG2D, suggesting the link between soluble MICA and NKG2D expression in cancer patients.

It is generally speculated that soluble MICA/B produced from tumors may deactivate NKG2D-mediated immune responses.(8,9) In vitro experiment indicates that soluble MICA could downregulate NKG2D expression and effector cell function. However, the regulation by soluble forms of NKG2D ligands would be more complicated in vivo. First, soluble forms of NKG2D ligands could be produced not only from malignant tissues but also from non-malignant tissues, as shown in the present study. Second, MHC-encoded MICA/B may not be the sole family of proteins serving as NKG2D ligands. Non-MHC-encoded UL16-binding proteins also act as NKG2D ligands and were very recently found to be cleaved proteolytically from tumor cells.(21) The present study provides evidence that soluble MICA is derived, at least in part, from HCC and regulates NKG2D expression on NK and CD8-positive T cells. Although several species of soluble NKG2D ligands may exist in the circulation, the present study suggests that soluble MICA regulates NKG2D expression directly in cancer patients.

In conclusion, soluble MICA and MICB are significantly increased in the sera of patients not only with HCC but also with chronic liver disease. Soluble MICA/B increases together with the progression of liver disease as well as the tumor. Therapeutic intervention for HCC leads to reduction of soluble MICA levels in association with upregulation of NKG2D on immune cells, offering in vivo evidence of soluble MICA regulating NKG2D expression. Thus, cancer therapy may have a beneficial effect on the NKG2D-mediated immune response even if some of the soluble NKG2D ligands are produced from non-cancerous premalignant tissues.

Acknowledgments

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Materials and Methods
  4. Results
  5. Discussion
  6. Acknowledgments
  7. References

We sincerely thank Dr Veronika Groh and Dr Thomas Spies (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA) for providing 6D4 antibody and Dr Alexander Steinle (University Tübingen, Tübingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany) for providing the RSV-MICA*04 and control plasmids. This work was supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology, Japan and a Grant-in-Aid for Research on hepatitis and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) from the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare, Japan.

References

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Materials and Methods
  4. Results
  5. Discussion
  6. Acknowledgments
  7. References