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Abstract

Data from a 1988 survey of US drinking habits and related problems revealed differences in male and female patterns of alcohol consumption. Men were more likely than women to be current drinkers (64 v. 41%), and beer accounted for a larger proportion of their overall intake. Men's average daily ethanol intake was about twice as high as that of women, 17.5 v. 8.9 g. Adjustment for differences in body weight and composition substantially reduced the male-to-female ratio of consumption. Men were more likely than women to be classified as heavy drinkers, and the excess proportion of males so categorized increased with the severity of the measure of heavy drinking.