Individual, partner and relationship factors associated with non-medical use of prescription drugs

Authors

  • Gregory G. Homish,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Health Behavior, Research Institute on Addictions, and Department of Family Medicine, The State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA, Research Institute on Addictions and Department of Psychiatry, The State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA
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  • Kenneth E. Leonard,

    1. and
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  • Jack R. Cornelius

    1. University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
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  • Part of this work was presented at the 71st Annual Scientific Meeting of The College on Problems of Drug Dependence, Reno, Nevada, 23 June 2009.

Gregory G. Homish, Department of Health Behavior, Research Institute on Addictions, and Department of Family Medicine, The State University of New York at Buffalo, 325 Kimball Tower, 3435 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA. E-mail: ghomish@buffalo.edu

ABSTRACT

Aims  The objective of the current report was to examine individual, partner and relationship factors (e.g. relationship satisfaction) associated with the non-medical use of prescription drugs (NMUPD) in a community sample of married adults.

Design  The current report used two waves of data from an ongoing study of couples who were recruited at the time they applied for their marriage license and are now in the 10th year of follow-up. Logistic regression models examined the relation between individual, partner and relationship factors and NMUPD.

Participants  This report is based on 273 couples.

Measurements  Participants completed questionnaires that assessed prescription drug use, alcohol use, other substance use, depression, marital satisfaction and socio-demographic factors.

Findings  Among wives, there was evidence that a partner's prescription drug use and relationship factors were associated with increased risk for NMUPD. There was some evidence suggesting that it was the increased access or availability, and not the partner's use per se, that was related to the NMUPD. These results persisted after controlling for other illicit drug use, heavy drinking, depressive symptomatology and socio-demographic factors. Among men, neither partner use nor relationship factors were associated with NMUPD after considering the impact of individual-level risk factors.

Conclusion  Prevention and intervention efforts directed at reducing the risk for NMUPD should consider the influence of partner and relationship factors in addition to individual-level risk factors.

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